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Summer Goals for Summer Blues

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by Shezad Khan

It’s already week nine of spring term, which means summer break is very, very close. I’m incredibly relieved and excited for the three month escape from schoolwork. Since I took classes last summer, I’ve been craving an extended amount of down time. If you’re anything like me, however, that down time can lead to some extreme boredom and sluggishness.

For me, it’s important to stay active during summer break – both physically and mentally. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a drink or ten to celebrate the end of the school year and/or your graduation or sit on the couch and binge watch five different shows on Netflix – go ahead, you’ve earned it – but it does mean making sure that kind of behavior doesn’t become cyclical and negative. This is especially important for those of us who suffer from anxiety and depression.

Something that I’m going to do to make sure my summer break is productive is keep a list of goals. I know, super cliché, right? But it will definitely help. Here are some of the goals that I’m setting for myself:

  • Read: I want to finish at least ten books over the course of this summer break. I don’t have enough time to read for pleasure during the school year, so I want to make my time off count.
  • Play Soccer: Playing soccer a few times a week is not only fun, but very healthy as well.
  • Look for internships/apply for scholarships: Yes, unfortunately, some work does have to be down over summer break. Grad school is coming up, and it’s not cheap. Looking for internships that apply to my field will help me find a career down the line. And with scholarships, well, who doesn’t need extra money?
  • Work, work, work: Summer break is a great time to try and boost your hours at work. Work may be stressful sometimes, but it’s a lot less stressful when you don’t have to worry about schoolwork on top of it.

These are just a few goals I have for myself to make sure my break is well-spent and productive. I would urge all of you to find your own goals. It really is good for you.

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Awaiting the Looming Changes in Campus Security

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By Chelsea Ware

June will bring many things: the end to an arduous spring quarter, warm weather, but most importantly it is when the PSU Board of Trustees will review and vote on an implementation plan for armed security on campus. In December of 2014, the PSU Board of Trustees voted 11 to 2 in favor of having an armed police force on campus and for the past 5 months they have been constructing the details of how the officers will operate.

Under the plan, PSU will hire 12 police officers to join campus security. The decision was also a result of Portland State University President Wim Weiwel’s Task Force on campus safety; a group composed of members of the PSU community who spent six months studying safety on campus. The President’s Task Force suggested that PSU should have armed officers due to PSU’s proximity to downtown, its steady growth of students, and lack of safety resources.

The deaths that have taken place in Baltimore, New York, and Ferguson have left many students feeling uneasy about PSU’s proposed security plan. However, board members have expressed their hope that PSU can work to cultivate a security department that reflects the Portland State values of diversity and accountability.

Do you think that having armed officers on campus will add to students’ safety? As someone who lives on campus, I know that I will be following the upcoming changes closely and I encourage you to also. Whether you are pro or against the upcoming changes, it is important that we all stay engaged during this process.

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If Chivalry is Dead, We’re Stuck at the Wake

Teddi Faller

Teddi Faller

The other day I read an article about “benevolent sexism”, which did a wonderful job of discussing the problems of chivalrous behavior by explaining rather than accusing – unlike this article celebrating its death, or this one blaming women for it.

Both men and women face incredible pressure to do things a certain way. Men pay for things, open doors, and have this expectation to protect their women. We accept this because that’s how we define “men”.

It’s easy for women to say we don’t care whether a guy always picks up the check, but I don’t think that women could ever understand why it bothers men so much; however, we can certainly be sympathetic.

These three common instances only help perpetuate everyday sexism, which hurts not only women but also men:

1. Men “have” to pay.
With more women in the workforce with equal qualifications and education, it’s becoming more likely that a woman could make more than her male partner. But this prevailing idea that the man must pay for everything hurts both parties – he can’t afford it, and she feels guilty because he won’t have her pay.

2. Men waiting on women.
The reasons men waiting on women can be borderline offensive – even though many women appreciate it – is better outlined in the first article mentioned than I could ever do.
For men, however, this “chivalrous” behavior is and was created by extrinsic pressures from other men to treat their “ladies” as delicate. Men who do these things are considered “better” than others. Those who don’t get nitpicked by their families, friends, her friends, and potentially the gal herself. However, the creation of chivalry is also a way to differentiate between classes – is a guy less worthy because he wasn’t taught chivalry? No.

3. The “stupid” husband/boyfriend
This is the most problematic because there is nothing empowering about tearing someone down – particularly when it’s targeting an entire gender. How many times have commercials for household items portrayed a confused, sloppy husband? While I’m sure these couples exist – hence the stereotype – always showing men who don’t know how to pack their child’s lunch or change a diaper, normalizes and internalizes the idea that only – cisgendered heterosexual – women can raise a child.

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The Power of Orange

By Olivia Clarke

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On my bedroom curtain, secured with a safety pin, is a little square of orange fabric. I got the square when I attended PSU’s Sustainability Celebration last spring – in return for my signature on a Divest PSU petition, I received this piece of fabric as a symbol of my support for rethinking the university’s investments.

Divestment aims to deny financial resources to governments and industries that are viewed as harmful or unjust. While the hot-button divestment issue for the previous generation was South African apartheid, the current topic of concern among universities across the nation is the environment: specifically, the fossil fuel companies that are hurting it (and that receive financial support from our school every year). The Divest PSU campaign began in 2014, and it seems to be gaining momentum. Divest PSU holds weekly meetings, and those orange squares are getting more recognition around campus.

As a sustainability-minded student, I have high hopes for this campaign: I know how hard some people work to lead sustainable lifestyles, but the environment can’t be saved by our personal choices alone. Even if I carpool and recycle, my impact pales in comparison to the financial influence of my school and other universities around the country. For this reason, I support the Divest PSU organizers who are using their power as students to speak up for a more ethical PSU that stays true to its environmental values. After all, our logo isn’t green for nothing.

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Planning Ahead

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By: Andreea Nica

I like to plan. Planning provides me security, a comfort that I’m on the right track. Or, at least it gives me the feeling I’m getting there.

When I began the doctoral program at PSU, I knew there was much work ahead, but surprisingly, it wasn’t the work that had me bogged down. Rather, it was the organization and execution of my five-year plan in the program. I had some vague ideas like any aspiring academic, such as publishing, conferences, teaching and research. But I soon realized that these vague notions of developing oneself as a scholar needed some filling in.

When did I want to publish? And with whom? How many conferences should I attend? What should I teach? What about funding? How many small research projects should I conduct? I needed more direction, and once I gained it from discussions with colleagues and professors inside and outside the department, I began filling in the details of my five-year plan. Excel came to my rescue. I began to organize my goals (brief statements, really) into an Excel document with proposed dates of completion, deadlines for funding opportunities, outcome goals and people I should talk further with regarding the respective goal.

While I am aware that plans change, organizing my time and goals in the graduate program has boosted my confidence and provided a clearer direction on what I want to achieve. I would recommend starting out with one- to two-year plans as they are easier to manage than longer-term plans. After all, many things can change over the course of four to five years.

Good luck planning!

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The 51st Annual Nina Mae Kellogg Awards

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By Shezad Khan

If you’re looking to go to a PSU event this month, the Kellogg Awards Ceremony is just a couple of weeks away. I went to the Kellogg Awards for the first time last year when a writing professor insisted that we attend. Being an English major, I should have gone before. Not only was it a fun event to go to, three friends of mine won awards and I had no idea they were contestants.

So what are the Kellogg Awards? The awards recognize excellence in writing. There are 21 different awards for poetry, fiction, or non-fiction with prizes ranging from $100 to $2,000 – these awards are serious business! Plus winners get the recognition of winning such a great reward for their writing. The event provides a wonderful opportunity to see people from your community – from your college –achieve great things, and the event is completely free, so you should go show your support.

The ceremony is going to be held on Monday, May 18th, at 5:30 p.m. at the Native American Student and Community Center on campus, 710 SW Jackson Street. This year’s guest speaker is going to be Mike Davis who is the author of City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles.

Last year there was free food and beer! How much more motivation do you need?

(Although this event is free and open to the public, they ask that you RSVP.)

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Summer, you’re taking very long to get here!

10373989_844446705612551_3373063601715068845_nWritten By: Jasmin Landa

As slow as summer is approaching, so are my plans for that time-frame. But what I do know of my summer is that I will be spending a small portion of my time in a classroom.

Summer classes are a definite for my plans this summer not because I direly need the credits, but because I want a little cushion going into the next academic terms. And also, I am a double major and a double minor, and would like to graduate within four years. Summer session allows me to take courses that would otherwise be taken in a the regular academic terms, thus making my four-year degree goal possible.

For the most part, I want to keep my classes within the first three days of the week, allowing me to enjoy the summer weather, work a part-time job and enjoy a little bit of free-time before the school year begins.

Summer 2015 will be one to remember: My mind will be working hard in the classroom and I’ll be experiencing the wonderful adventures that summer will bring to me here in this beautiful city.