college

A Major Change

Chronicles Grav

By Shezad Khan

The fact that I’ll be a graduate student in about a month has me thinking about my undergrad years and how I struggled with deciding on a major. As a new college student, I firmly believed that I was going to major in biology. Being a bio major was something I had “figured out” in high school. But as time went on, I changed my mind. I came to the realization that I wanted to major in English – a subject that I truly loved.

I recently listened to a couple of younger college students discuss their indecision about what they wanted to do. This seems universal; I hear it from friends, family members, and other students. Now that I’ve finished my undergrad, it always seems interesting how much people stress about their major.

It’s a clichéd piece of advice to tell people they have time to figure out what they want to do – but it’s true. I guess my main piece of advice for new students, or continuing students who are still undecided, is to not stress about it. I changed my major sophomore year, and I know people who have changed their majors three or four times before finding what they truly wanted. I think the key to deciding your major is your happiness. If what you’re doing doesn’t make you happy, then don’t do it.

Find a subject that you love, and go for it. No matter what anyone else says or thinks about it, stick to it. You’re going to be in college for quite some time, you may as well have a passion for it.

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The Museum of Trees

Screen Shot 2015-08-26 at 1.44.15 PM By: James Wilson

As much as I love the Rec Center for all the services it offers, it isn’t the only place to have fun. We are lucky not only because our Rec Center is the best gym in the downtown area, but also because we live in the Pacific Northwest. What is great about Portland is all the options that surround our campus.

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This week I decided to take a trip with my partner to Hoyt Arboretum, which is just a quick Blue Line ride from The Galleria to the Oregon Zoo. The arboretum, an amazing tree-filled park, is right next door. It’s a great and local option for hiking since it’s right near the PSU campus.

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What a Wonderful Year

meBy: Sharon Nellist

This upcoming year at Portland State is the one I have been waiting for.

Not only is it my last undergraduate year (hoping to stay for graduate studies!), but I am comfortably involved in various ways to ensure that quintessential college experience that I have been pining for all of my young adult life – and I am elated!

I WRITE – for the PSU Chronicles, and I love it. This is my voice and I intend to use it. I hope to flourish my opinion on controversial issues not only on campus but within my community. This is the only option for change.

I PLAY – or rather dabble in various Rec clubs from swing dancing, to Dragon Boat racing, and rowing. I am taking advantage of all that our unique urban campus has to offer like the week-long community celebration Portland State of Mind, FREE movies at the student-run 5th Avenue Cinema, and the privilege of listening to generous amounts of brilliant minds at PSU hosted events.

I SERVE – as a Student Leader for Service through the Student Community Engagement Center. Stepping a bit out my box and yearning for growth as a leader, I am a liaison between PSU and Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives’ Healthy Food Access Program. I also am tending community gardens at low-income properties, working with residents and hosting workshops on garden eating, helping organize community service projects and getting PSU students involved! It cannot get any more GREEN or PORTLAND than this.

My only advice to all of the new students – live these years to the fullest, PSU is simply handing it to you.

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The Hidden Power in Saying No

By: Chelsea Ware

This upcoming fall quarter will mark my last year at Portland State. The combination of summer classes ending and receiving graduation notices from PSU in my mailbox have been making me reflect on what I have learned during my time here.

The multitude of classes I have taken have allowed me to expand and develop in ways I didn’t expect. One of the biggest skills that I have gathered is how to say “no” to certain people and requests. I think that society, and women in particular, are to taught to please and say “yes” even when that little voice in our head is screaming for us not to. We put ourselves in situations that cause anxiety and stress just so we can try to avoid looking bad and disappointing other people.

However, you can never be productive if you take on a burdensome amount of commitments and responsibilities. You end up spreading yourself too thin and unable to get anything done well or on time. It’s simply not good for either party when one agrees to requests that they can’t or shouldn’t do.

It takes guts to say it, but when used wisely, “no” can be an instrument of honesty and autonomy while also acting as a shield against burnout and angst. The power and beauty of “no” lies in its ability to set limits that define how we respect and see ourselves. “No” keeps us true to our values and allows us to devote time to things that we sincerely care about.

So try it sometime! I’m sure you will feel your backbone and confidence get stronger.

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A COLLEGE STUDENT’S PLAYGROUND

xyliaBy: Xylia Lydgate

I have been coming to Campus Rec for a little over two years now but only recently watched (and rewatched) this video— gives me goosebumps every time! What strikes me most about it is how it really accentuates the inclusivity at Campus Rec. It is more than just a building or a gym; it’s a community that welcomes all students and community members with open arms.

As a Campus Rec employee, I find myself here all the time; partly because I work here but also because it’s a place where I can relax and unwind after a long day. When I’m done with school and work, I stay and hit the Fitness Center. I’ve never been much of the athletic or “sporty” type— and for the record, I’m probably the most uncoordinated person when it comes to hitting, throwing or dodging balls— but I simply enjoy working out on my own. Moving from the cardio floor to the weight room, I become easily lost in the tempo of my workout routine, the catchy tunes of my playlist, the rhythm of counting my reps, and the constant beating of basketballs hitting wooden courts fade into the soundscape.

There’s a place for everyone here, even if you’re not a “gym junkie.” Hit the courts and play a youthful game of H-O-R-S-E, challenge your friends to a match of table tennis or grab a couple swim noodles and hose down a friend in the pool (yes, they do serve as multi-functional water guns). Of course ya can’t forget about our TV lounge and those comfy couches in the locker rooms! So the next time you’re waiting between classes or need a place to “hang out,” drop by the Rec and make yourself at home.

How do you like to play?

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New tuition rates help only in-state students

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By Marilynn Sandoval

As I was reading the news, I came upon an article saying Portland State is lowering the planned fall tuition increase from 4.2 percent to 3.1 percent. I instantly started to read the article, because it obviously concerned me as a student. As I read, my happiness quickly faded.

Although reducing the increase is amazing and will end up being a huge help for some PSU students, it won’t help me.

Full-time, in-state students  will save $90 each term. That isn’t a lot, but it is something still to be grateful for. Other universities such as the University of Oregon and Oregon State University didn’t lower their increases at all..

However, as an out-of-state student, I won’t benefit. I will pay $180 more next year than last year. The tuition for non-residents will still be $4,236 more per term than an in-state student pays — a total of $12,708 more for the year. That doesn’t include any other fees I will encounter.

PSU also is using the state funding to hire more advisors, faculty and other services. Although it seems like nothing, more support will ultimately help students stay on track. This will actually benefit all students, resident or non-resident.

To learn more about how Oregon university presidents are advocating for higher education funding, read this article http://bit.ly/1M5FkyY.

Fight and have faith

10373989_844446705612551_3373063601715068845_nWritten by: Jasmin Landa

I have no words, but I am still typing. I have failed, but I still have my strength to lift me back up.

Time and time again I have so much to be grateful for, but at times of weakness I find myself complaining or crying for something that might have been, was just right or was all that I ever wanted. But then I sit back and think, am I willing to fight for what I want? Yes. Will I fail again? Of course! And finally, how much am I willing to work for what I want?

Life isn’t easy, nor are the decision that we make. But just as time heals, repairs and builds a stronger self-portrait, it can only do that when you fight and have faith that all things meant to be will be. You cannot resist it, force it, nor make it be, but rather let it be.

So I am ready to fight, love and be a part of this journey we call life, because I have been given another day to appreciate the little things and love all those who enter my life just as they are. Are you ready for what this day will hold for you, your future and the dreams you strive for? Because I am!