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Posts from the ‘Professors’ Category

Moving at the Lightspeed of Education

By: Shezad Khan

Over summer term I took the first year of Latin courses. It was my first experience with summer term, so I wasn’t used to being in school during the three months I’d usually be at home doing nothing. PSU’s campus was sunny and quiet, void of the bustle seen during fall through spring, and it seemed so much more relaxed. I learned quickly, however, that summer term isn’t to be taken lightly.

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One year of Latin was compacted and smashed into a rigorous and intense nine weeks. That’s right, Latin 101 through 103 in just nine weeks, that’s less than a third of the normal school year. We covered a week’s worth of material per day, and class was held Monday through Thursday – each class was three hours and fifteen minutes long. The baristas at Starbucks started knowing me by name. I devoted hours to studying every day. I had well over 200 notecards, three filled up notebooks, more than a few dead pens, and my quivering sanity that I was struggling to keep together – it didn’t help that I was working almost forty hours a week at that time.

That being said, if you’re considering taking summer courses, you should do it. Yeah, it’s probably going to be tough and you might want to cry sometimes – especially if it’s a foreign language – but you’ll pull through and you’ll feel very good about yourself, I promise. Plus you get to meet awesome people who are just as crazy as you for taking such an intense course!

#New2PSU

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Photo Credit: Jasmin Landa

By: Jasmin Landa

Every ending is merely a new beginning. But I confess that as I stood in line in freshman orientation, I was scared about what this new beginning would bring.

I grew up in a small city in Nevada, and have been used to a dry desert atmosphere with mountains that don’t have all the luxurious trees that one sees in Oregon. So as I began to contemplate more and more about my move to Portland, with my mom and my little sister by my side, I began to cry and felt like I wasn’t where I was meant to be. Was I a future Viking? Is this where I am supposed to be? I cried for what felt like hours, but my mom looked at me and assured me that everything will be OK. Things happen for their destined reason, although you may not know today what those reasons are.

She was correct. My freshman orientation was much more than what I expected. I looked around and saw so much diversity, culture and excitement; all the students waiting were anxious to begin their new chapter as Portland State University freshmen. I felt welcomed, informed and enthused by all those around me.

I had been scared at the thought of leaving my home in Nevada along with all my family and all my supporters. But what I didn’t realize before, and what I know now, is that I am gaining a whole student body, staff and friends as supporters who will encourage, support and believe in my dreams and successes.

I cannot wait to be a Viking with the rest of my classmates, community and alumni.

The PSU Mobile App – A Must Have!

The PSU mobile app is a one-stop shop for your PSU needs and a must have. The free app has extensive features, including a campus directory, event and listing calendars, library services and various other useful information for students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors.

The features that I use the most are news, photos and the library services. They are cool and here’s why.

News: I get to know the latest happenings at PSU via the news feature. Updated almost on a daily basis, the news feature highlights some of the cool events that are due in the coming days.

Photos: The photo feature enables me to breathe PSU because it sources information from “PSU on Instagram” and categorizes photos under “This year at PSU”, “Best of Portland State” and “Campus Life.” I get the sense of belonging to PSU as I see the happy faces featured every day in the photo gallery, making me happy to be a part of the university.

Library services: The library feature, although not completely integrated into the PSU mobile app, is another cool feature. It lets you book a study room directly from the app—a must for dead week— and also enables catalog searches for information.

PSU is big and I do get lost at times. Thanks to the maps feature in the mobile app, I am able to locate the building that I am looking for fairly easily. The feature tracks your location and helps navigate through the university.

The D2L integration is the next thing due for the mobile app, but it does have enough cool features to make it worth it for your mobile. Have you downloaded the mobile app?

-Guru

Link for more information:https://m.pdx.edu/info/

School ends in the hands of venture capitalists

For many of us in the MBA full-time cohort of 2012, the countdown for graduation has begun. In fact it is going to be on the 12th of June. Looking back it has been a wonderful journey. We fondly remember the day when we all first met at the welcoming reception, and since classes kicked off in September 2012, we have been on a tight schedule. Pioneering innovation, Financial Accounting and Foundational Strategy have been my favorite courses.

In the second year, me and a group of my friends took the entrepreneurship elective “Start-up Strategy – Launch in 9”. We had to come up with a unique idea, do market research, evaluate business feasibility and present to a panel of judges at the end of the term. Our team was one of those selected to further develop our concept in a capstone project. As we wrap up our capstone, we look forward to the final day this term when we will be pitching our idea to a panel of venture capitalists. The Launch-in-9 program is open to cohorts of other disciplines as well. For more information on the Launch-in-9 program, please visit – http://rethink.pdx.edu/?q=node/168

-Guruprasad TG

Things I Learned in Canada:

Things I Learned in Canada:

By Amanda Katz

• Beanies are called toques.
• Beanie babies are called beanies.
• Poutine is actually really good.
• Canadians don’t use pennies.
• One dollar coins are called loonies.
• Two dollar coins are called toonies.
• The drinking age is 19.
• Sales tax is horrible.
• 100 kmph is 60 mph.
• Buses flash “Sorry” when they aren’t in service but still on the road.
• When you bump into a Canadian they say sorry, too.
• You can’t bring Kinder Eggs back into the U.S.

All silliness aside, I had a great time in New Westminster, Canada at a conference for student leaders in higher education. I networked with other students from the Pacific North West Region and brought back a lot of new skills and information that I plan on utilizing in this upcoming year.

Have you ever been to Canada or another country? What fun things did you learn?

A live phone call — someone loves me

By: Theo Burke

"Hey, I didn't know it could TALK!"

“Hey, I didn’t know it could TALK!”

Not long ago, while working on a PSU Vanguard story, I received a return phone call, within 24 hours, from Scott Gallagher of the University Communications office. I nearly fell down from shock.

I had not received a live phone call in months from anyone other than my mother. And it seemed as though an ever-increasing amount of important people in my life had barricaded themselves behind “email walls.”

When I recently asked to meet with an editor at one of the three student media outlets I worked for, she simply refused to do it. Her supervisor had established a policy, she said, that editors could limit communications with writers to email. No meetings, live conversations, or body language required.

A professor supervising me on a huge term paper could only be reached by email and was only on campus two days per week. She had not even set up the voice mail on her office phone. But this makes her no different from most PSU profs —not a single professor in my three years here has used the office phone.

Mr. Gallagher reminded me what humans are capable of. Follow up.  Consideration. Professionalism. Simple human respect and kindness. And he understands that the old standards of professionalism still matter to do your job.

I submit to you all that we will not be able to live without live voice communication and nonverbal body language over the long run. We will not be able to abandon those and hold onto the jobs that we like, as well.

No amount of quiet, feverish tapping on our devices will replace our voices and ourselves.

| Visual Culture |

By: Sierra Pruitt

| Visual Culture |

It’s so easy to be insecure and jealous when you live in a visual culture — being jealous of where people are, what they are doing, why they are so beautiful, and why they are popular. I am surrounded by a community of people who express themselves creatively through visual means such as photography. The culture we live in today thrives on visual stimulation.

I have fallen into the trap of comparing myself to other artists and to my friends. Because we are in a visual society, we start looking at ourselves in terms of: Am I worth being in the picture? Am I worth talking to if I don’t take good photos? Am I worth someone’s time? These are the negative thoughts that sometimes run through my mind. They’re destructive, but they’re also worth pondering.

Why should I be worried when all that matters is being who I was made to be? This has really been on my heart because it reminds me of what I should really be refocusing on and that my friend, is God. He doesn’t want me to be jealous or insecure. He wants my heart.

What are your concerns about the visual world we live in today and the effects it has on us?

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