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Posts from the ‘Urban Honors’ Category

You Don’t Know What You Got . . .

Student Insurance . . . plus SHAC is available, too.

Student Insurance . . . plus SHAC is available, too.

By: Theo Burke

As I graduate, besides memories and friends, I am leaving behind the awesome Portland State student health insurance. I’ve written about this before, now I’m experiencing the difference.

Since I don’t know what job is coming down the pike or what kind of health insurance it might carry, I’ve applied for individual insurance through Cover Oregon, the state exchange that sells private health plans (with federal subsidies to help pay the premiums) under the Affordable Care Act, or “ObamaCare.” The state exchange will alternatively sign you up automatically for the state’s Medicaid program (the Oregon Health Plan) if you qualify.

In the real world, I will have to think more about the deductible. A deductible is an amount you pay each year (usually $250 – $1000 or higher) before any benefits are paid by your health insurer.

At PSU, the deductible was $0.00.

My present doctors might not be covered by a new insurance company. At PSU, the Aetna provider network was vast.

I will have to worry more about whether alternative care is covered. At PSU, naturopathic doctors are treated the same as primary care doctors, and chiropractors are covered up to twelve visits per year.

Weirdly enough, when I heard from Cover Oregon recently, they put me in the Oregon Health Plan, even though I reported enough income to disqualify me from that program. Now I will have to figure out the Medicaid ”world,” which works much differently than the private insurers’ system, or else contest my placement in that program with Cover Oregon.

Students, the PSU plan won’t throw you such curve balls. You have an awesome, generous health plan, and you should take advantage of it before you graduate. As I’ve said before, you don’t know what you’ve got, until you lose it.

Internship Glory

By: Kadie Kobielusz

Yay! I finally landed an internship! I feel on top of the world (like my picture).

It took a lot of hard work and searching, but it obviously paid off. I found my internship through Internships.com, which is a great site where you can upload your resume, and just apply, apply, apply. Plus, I feel like the legitimacy of the jobs and workplaces there are far higher than people posting to Craigslist (though I suppose it depends on your career field).

My tips for you are:

  1. Even if you want to do an internship later on in the summer or fall, apply now! If they accept you, you can negotiate the start date. Or, you can be like me and find a way for it to work now, because it’s an INTERNSHIP!
  2. Make a list of all the places you’ve applied to, so down the line you can follow up, reapply and show your dedication if you haven’t scored a place yet.
  3. Talk to people. Mention to your friends and professors that you’re looking for one. There could be that friend of a friend who needs an intern.
  4. Don’t give up. If you’re not finding your dream internship, look at the whole spectrum of internships in your field and related fields. For example, being a graphic design student, I was also looking for internships in photography since that’s a highly useful skill in design.

Do you all have any more tips? Best of luck!

I’m No Different than Other Women

By: Kadie Kobielusz

It takes just one guy…to ruin everything.

I know this is a bold statement, but this is how I’ve been feeling. You wonder why you don’t see much PDA with bi or lesbian women. Well, this is why.

It was Valentine’s Day, and I took this girl I really care about out to the movies. We decided tonight would be the night to make a statement and have some fun. Going to the movies, we casually linked arms, and we got unwelcoming, longer-than-appreciated stares. Things were going well, relatively speaking. Then walking back, we decided to hold hands. Instantly, a guy mumbled something sexual, and looked up and down my body like I was a picture in a “Playboy” magazine. From that point on, with every group of guys we passed, we hesitated more and more to hold hands.

So I would just like to say:

Just because I’m bi and like other women, does NOT mean that you get two trophies. If you keep this up, all you’ll get is one dishonest woman.

Vikings in the Super Bowl

By: DeLon R. Lewis

20140131-161153.jpg
Julius Thomas

This Sunday, Feb. 2, will mark the first time in which two players from Portland State – DeShawn Shead and Julius Thomas – face off in the Super Bowl.

Shead is a member of the Seattle Seahawks’ infamous “Legion of Boom” defensive backfield, which includes NFL Defensive Player of the Year candidates Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman. At PSU, Shead was named Most Outstanding Defensive Back three years in a row, 2008 through 2010.

Thomas, tight end for the Denver Broncos, I actually wrote a blog about Julius Thomas after the first game of the season: http://psuchronicles.com/2013/10/11/from-psu-to-the-nfl/

Whether or not you are a football fan, you should check out Super Bowl XLVIII on Sunday to witness two Portland State football legends compete for the pinnacle of their careers. I am looking forward to this game to see my hometown Seattle Seahawks bring home our first Super Bowl trophy. Who do you think is going to win the Super Bowl, Shead’s Seahwaks, or Thomas’ Broncos?

Congratulations and good luck to Deshawn Shead, and Julius Thomas on their accomplishments! As always, GO VIKS!

20140131-162059.jpg
DeShawn Shead (right)

A live phone call — someone loves me

By: Theo Burke

"Hey, I didn't know it could TALK!"

“Hey, I didn’t know it could TALK!”

Not long ago, while working on a PSU Vanguard story, I received a return phone call, within 24 hours, from Scott Gallagher of the University Communications office. I nearly fell down from shock.

I had not received a live phone call in months from anyone other than my mother. And it seemed as though an ever-increasing amount of important people in my life had barricaded themselves behind “email walls.”

When I recently asked to meet with an editor at one of the three student media outlets I worked for, she simply refused to do it. Her supervisor had established a policy, she said, that editors could limit communications with writers to email. No meetings, live conversations, or body language required.

A professor supervising me on a huge term paper could only be reached by email and was only on campus two days per week. She had not even set up the voice mail on her office phone. But this makes her no different from most PSU profs —not a single professor in my three years here has used the office phone.

Mr. Gallagher reminded me what humans are capable of. Follow up.  Consideration. Professionalism. Simple human respect and kindness. And he understands that the old standards of professionalism still matter to do your job.

I submit to you all that we will not be able to live without live voice communication and nonverbal body language over the long run. We will not be able to abandon those and hold onto the jobs that we like, as well.

No amount of quiet, feverish tapping on our devices will replace our voices and ourselves.

This is no Fantasy Factory

By: Grace Carroll

As I settle into 2014, I face an unsettling reality: I am an adult. Well, sort of. It’s a work in progress. But nonetheless, the new year brings with it a new set of uncertainties raining down from its silver-confetti wings. Even my dorm, the place I have come to feel most comfortable, is rife with reminders that the concrete ground I stand on is by no means stable. With neighbors moving out, and the walls of my building plastered with posters that remind me to settle my 2014-15 Housing Contract, every direction I go reminds me that I have a lot to think about.

I am thrust forward, as though stuck on a moving walkway at the airport, into a realm where it is quite easy to feel that every mundane decision I make is just another step along the conveyor belt of my future. What machine will I make? I am now assembling its base. Whose idea was it, anyway—to leave me in charge of the rest of my life, without so much as a blueprint, when I just spent my first paycheck on a Nintendo 64? By many standards I am still young, and encouraged to retain my youth. However, at what point does continuing your childhood become irresponsible? I am certain that this year will bring me closer to answering this question—even if it is just another stop along the assembly line.

To eat spider, or not to eat spider?

By: Kadie Kobielusz

I am a huge fan of Upworthy.com. If you aren’t a fan of them on Facebook, you need to be, because their videos are insanely inspirational and informative. I just finished learning about entomophagy: the diet of eating…BUGS!

I was in cahoots when the video described lobsters as large bugs with legs, antennas and claws. True, but you don’t #$%@* eat those parts now do you? And they don’t go crunch in your mouth, either.

Yes, the video was compelling with the fact that bugs have about 80 percent protein as compared to beef. They also have an insanely high level of iron—which is great, because iron deficiency is currently the most common nutritional problem in the world.

spider on my plate

So what do you think? Would you bring a bag of crunchy bugs with you to keep up great levels of nutrition?

Check out the video here:

http://www.upworthy.com/watch-the-food-youre-probably-not-eating-for-all-the-wrong-reasons-8

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