Out-of-state student on paper, in-state by heart

jasmin.stairsBy: Jasmin Landa

Being an out-of-state student has truly been an adventure thus far. You see, I previously resided in Reno, Nevada, and loved the dry desert mountain land as my home and a place that describes what has raised me, but I felt that life always needs continuous change.

I wanted to make a drastic change that would require me to challenge myself. So I decided to do so during college — a change that would challenge my limits, perspectives and tolerances — all while expanding my cultural competency.

The journey began in the fall of 2014. I packed my bags, said goodbye to those who had helped me become the person I am and embarked on the road ahead to what was going to aid the dreams and aspirations that I so desired to accomplish. From day one, I acknowledged that the journey was not going to be easy by any means, but one in which I would find myself right where I needed to be.

It is now the winter term of 2015, and I have fallen in love with my decision to physically detach myself from what had made me, and attach myself to what would help me “become.”

I have already met wonderful people along this journey, both in and out of class: professors who always find ways to make me laugh and educate me, and the Portland State community at large. Being an out-of-state student brings a fresh perspective in my personal life that will carry me through my tribulations and triumphs.

I am excited, nervous and exasperated about the steps forward in my journey. As I take it day-by-day and opportunity-by-opportunity, I find myself learning and growing in all aspects of my life. I am an out-of-state student on paper, and in-state by heart.


How to dress like a PSU student in the winter

PSU Winter Starter Pack

By: Jasmin Landa

Winter term is here and so is the cold, wet weather. In addition to the obvious investments you need to succeed in class (books, supplies, etc.), also consider the clothes on your back. Here is a short list of how you can show Viking pride with PSU gear as you walk across a chilly and rainy urban campus.

Coat – Winter lows in Portland average 36 degrees Fahrenheit. A coat provides an outer shell to insulate you from the cold and wind.

Sweatshirt – For less chilly days, a PSU sweatshirt is a comfortable alternative. It’s great for class, and you can transition easily from the lecture hall to a Vikings sporting event.

T-Shirt – Under that sweatshirt, wear a Portland State of Mind T-shirt. They highlight the culture of the city and the campus’s unique relationship with the greater community.

Coffee mug – Caffeine is a big part of the Pacific Northwest culture. There are multiple coffee shops all around campus to keep you awake and at your best game. When you fill up, put it in a PSU mug.

Umbrella –Portland receives about 88 percent of its rain from October through May. A PSU umbrella will get you from building to building without getting soaked. PSU buildings also offer community umbrellas, so you can grab one if you forget yours.

Galoshes – Rain is inevitable in Portland, so try a pair Viking rain boots, which feel great and look cute.

Jeans – Although they aren’t really winter wear, the comfort of jeans allows you to walk around downtown and take advantage of PSU’s central location. They go with the casual nature of campus, located in the heart of downtown Portland.


Join •Participate•Be Fearless


Photo Credit: Jasmin Landa

By: Jasmin Landa

PSU’s annual Party in the Park commenced on Oct. 7, bringing together all campus organizations that can offer students avenues to particiapte in something they love, whether its something, whether its something pertaining to their educational major or an extracurricular activity.

Student organizations are a great way to get involved, an to find other students on campus with similar attributes, interests and excitement for activities.

During the Party in the Park, I was able to learn about, sign up for and connect with various student organizations, one being the Entrepreneurship Club (E-Club). This club and thos who are part of I inspire my dreams and entrepreneurial desires to start my own company one day. I am learning a lot while also discvering more about myself.

So as we approach winter term, have you joined any student organizations? Check out this list for some ideas. I encourage you to get involved: Join, participate and be fearless.


Three Tips for Picking Classes

By Grace Carroll


So you’ve just gotten a message to your .pdx e­mail that it’s time to register for classes.  Maybe you have a list of subjects you’ve always wanted to study, or maybe you just know the next Spanish class you need to take. Where ever you are in the process, here are some things to think about when registering:

● How often is the course offered? Keep in mind that some classes are not offered every term at PSU, while others are. For instance, most TOP: (topic) classes change each term, and if you find one specific to your interest, that should perhaps take priority over the Intro to Queer Studies class (a UNST Cluster course) that you’ve always wanted to take.

● What are your most productive times of the day? Sure, you’re sick of getting up with an early schedule, but maybe you’re just burnt out by evening classes. If you’re falling asleep in class, you may need to rearrange your day. Consider when you are most motivated during the day, and when you be best able to do your homework.

● Who is the professor? It’s true, you don’t always get much of a choice. But when you do, looking into your professors’ backgrounds can be a deciding factor in which classes you take. Portland State’s website has profiles for many of its faculty, so check the department pages for your courses. If you don’t find anything there, is your next step!

Still have questions? TALK TO YOUR ADVISER!

Nine Things I’ve Already Learned This Fall


By Grace Carroll

1. Living in a single can be scary. I almost choked on a corn nut.

2. Shared restrooms are not so bad. Despite living on a floor with roughly 25 girls, I rarely run into other people in the bathroom.

3. Volunteering is a good way to get involved with PSU. Volunteering at the Women’s Resource Center gives me the chance to help do important work in a friendly environment.

4. Yes, I CAN put off all the homework for my 400-level Honors seminar until the night before it is due.

5. College sports can be super fun. On a whim, I joined rugby, and you could say I’m having a BALL.

6. If while studying in the library, someone irritates you by loudly talking on the phone, DO NOT passive-aggressively write “SHHHH, IT’S A LIBRARY” on their notebook while they’re at the water fountain. Go to the fourth, fifth floors or the basement, they are designated for silent study!

7. You can have small class sizes even at Oregon’s biggest university. Last year, my classes had 30 students. This fall, I’m in a class of ten 10 (and the rest aren’t much bigger).

8. Unlike the “cool kids” in my building, I still love my meal plan.

9. Nothing is more beautiful than the Park Blocks in autumn.

Photo Jun 22, 6 44 28 PM

Wisconsin, don’tcha knooo?

By: Kadie Kobielusz

Over the summer, I was able to live in lands distant and exotic – ahem – in Wisconsin. Yeah big deal, right? Well, actually, I had one of my most eye-opening experiences when I lived there.

It’s an amazing thing when you are no longer looking at the world around you through the lens of a traveler. Instead, you’re a resident, somewhat forced to live and think and act like the people there do. You’re trying not to be the obvious outsider. I don’t know how to describe it very well, but Wisconsin was a lot more lowbrow than I was envisioning it. Especially coming from the leanest state, Colorado, to one of the most obese states.

Yes, I realize that’s not very polite, but it was culture shock. I found myself thinking: “That’s funny?” “We’re eating that for dinner?” “That’s entertainment?” Halfway through the summer though, words of wisdom came a guy at a bicycle shop. After discussing the area and such, he said: “In the end, it doesn’t matter where you’re living or what you’re out doing. What matters is who you’re with to make the adventure worthwhile.”

 It’s true. Sure, I may not have enjoyed what we were doing, or liked the area that much. However, I did thoroughly enjoy my company, and I should have been appreciating them all the while. They made me laugh, they were always up for doing new things and they were the friendliest and kindest people I think I have ever met.

And now that I’ve been away, guess who’s looking to move to Wisconsin after graduation?




Photo Credit: Jasmin Landa

By: Jasmin Landa

Every ending is merely a new beginning. But I confess that as I stood in line in freshman orientation, I was scared about what this new beginning would bring.

I grew up in a small city in Nevada, and have been used to a dry desert atmosphere with mountains that don’t have all the luxurious trees that one sees in Oregon. So as I began to contemplate more and more about my move to Portland, with my mom and my little sister by my side, I began to cry and felt like I wasn’t where I was meant to be. Was I a future Viking? Is this where I am supposed to be? I cried for what felt like hours, but my mom looked at me and assured me that everything will be OK. Things happen for their destined reason, although you may not know today what those reasons are.

She was correct. My freshman orientation was much more than what I expected. I looked around and saw so much diversity, culture and excitement; all the students waiting were anxious to begin their new chapter as Portland State University freshmen. I felt welcomed, informed and enthused by all those around me.

I had been scared at the thought of leaving my home in Nevada along with all my family and all my supporters. But what I didn’t realize before, and what I know now, is that I am gaining a whole student body, staff and friends as supporters who will encourage, support and believe in my dreams and successes.

I cannot wait to be a Viking with the rest of my classmates, community and alumni.