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Adventure Just Outside Your Door

Portland is a city surrounded by natural beauties, and now that the sunny weather is finally upon us, students may find themselves itching to reconnect with the great outdoors. No car? No problem! Here are six destinations guaranteed to ease your spring fever, no road trip required.

  • Mt. Tabor: Great for hiking, biking, and (my favorite) picnicking, Mt. Tabor is the crowned beauty of SE Portland, located at the top of the Hawthorne district.
  • Hoyt Arboretum: If you’re looking for a cool walk through the budding trees, the Arboretum is the place to go. It has tons of different trails to explore, including a walk to the Rose Garden.
  • Oaks Bottom: Take a walk on the wild side along the Crystal Springs Corridor and immerse yourself in the swamp-life of the Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge.
  • Bishop’s Close, whose wonderful gardens are a must-see this time of year, is a gorgeous and historic property situated above Elk Rock and looking out to the majestic Cascade Mountains. Take a stroll through the labyrinth of shrubbery or along the stream. Watch out for newts!
  • Tryon Creek State Park: Oregon’s only state park within a major metropolitan area, Tryon spans 645 acres of hiking, biking and horse riding trails that stretch through Multnomah and Clackamas counties.
  • Forest Park in the Tualatin Mountains is one of the largest urban forest reserves in the country. I would recommend the Balch Creek Canyon trail and a visit to the Audubon Society. The park encompasses the best of Portland’s natural areas, so there’s really no wrong way to go.

An open letter to the Registrar’s Office, or rather what it represents

By: Emily Skeen

Dear Registrar’s Office,

I’m not graduating yet. Now, I’ve never met you, so I’d like to begin this by saying I’m sure you are probably a lovely group of people. Please know that none of this is actually directed at the specific individuals sending these emails to possibly-soon-to-be-graduates, but rather the university they are writing on behalf of, the society who says I should be in a different place than I am, and all the things that these emails represent. You get the gist, right? Anyways, where was I? Oh yeah, graduating. I’m not graduating yet! And while I appreciate the 5, yes 5, emails I have received from you letting me know that I should probably be getting up and out of here and on with my life, I’m not. I will, I don’t plan to stay at PSU forever, $40,000 of debt is enough for me, I’m just not done yet. And that doesn’t mean I’ve been fooling around, or going part time, or anything else, it just means that my degree doesn’t really fit in with that fancy new “4 year guarantee” the university seems to be rolling out now. And not just because I transferred, it just isn’t possible for a student to come take classes full time, be involved in all the things you need to be involved in to have any shot at getting in to a good grad school, work 20 hours a week, be in a relationship, have a social life, and sometimes even eat, sleep, and if I’m really lucky, shower. So thank you for the reminders, I’m sure I will appreciate them when that happy time of my graduation does happen upon me, but until then kindly take your emails away and stop reminding me that I’m a little bit behind the “average student”. I’ve never been average, why would I start now?

Sincerely

A slightly hectic super-senior

One with the dragon

By: Sharon Jackson

In between lectures and essays, I will always have Dragon Boat. There is nothing like being on the open water with the wind in my face while gliding with focus through the Willamette on a warm spring day. Oh, and it is a full-body workout as well. It is the beginning of a new season and I feel like a full-body bruise, but that is all worth it for the experience in the end. It is an amazing feeling when 20 paddlers, on a more than 2,000-year-old boat with a Dragon head, synchronize to maintain a rhythmic power as if nothing in the world can stop us. An even better feeling is when we place first in a race – Rose Festival here we come! But most of all it is worth the relationships that are gained and the immediate trust that continues to grow among us. We row as ONE. And only then, I am able to continue to my class – Oui, parler en française.

dragonboat1

School ends in the hands of venture capitalists

For many of us in the MBA full-time cohort of 2012, the countdown for graduation has begun. In fact it is going to be on the 12th of June. Looking back it has been a wonderful journey. We fondly remember the day when we all first met at the welcoming reception, and since classes kicked off in September 2012, we have been on a tight schedule. Pioneering innovation, Financial Accounting and Foundational Strategy have been my favorite courses.

In the second year, me and a group of my friends took the entrepreneurship elective “Start-up Strategy – Launch in 9”. We had to come up with a unique idea, do market research, evaluate business feasibility and present to a panel of judges at the end of the term. Our team was one of those selected to further develop our concept in a capstone project. As we wrap up our capstone, we look forward to the final day this term when we will be pitching our idea to a panel of venture capitalists. The Launch-in-9 program is open to cohorts of other disciplines as well. For more information on the Launch-in-9 program, please visit – http://rethink.pdx.edu/?q=node/168

-Guruprasad TG

You Don’t Know What You Got . . .

Student Insurance . . . plus SHAC is available, too.

Student Insurance . . . plus SHAC is available, too.

By: Theo Burke

As I graduate, besides memories and friends, I am leaving behind the awesome Portland State student health insurance. I’ve written about this before, now I’m experiencing the difference.

Since I don’t know what job is coming down the pike or what kind of health insurance it might carry, I’ve applied for individual insurance through Cover Oregon, the state exchange that sells private health plans (with federal subsidies to help pay the premiums) under the Affordable Care Act, or “ObamaCare.” The state exchange will alternatively sign you up automatically for the state’s Medicaid program (the Oregon Health Plan) if you qualify.

In the real world, I will have to think more about the deductible. A deductible is an amount you pay each year (usually $250 – $1000 or higher) before any benefits are paid by your health insurer.

At PSU, the deductible was $0.00.

My present doctors might not be covered by a new insurance company. At PSU, the Aetna provider network was vast.

I will have to worry more about whether alternative care is covered. At PSU, naturopathic doctors are treated the same as primary care doctors, and chiropractors are covered up to twelve visits per year.

Weirdly enough, when I heard from Cover Oregon recently, they put me in the Oregon Health Plan, even though I reported enough income to disqualify me from that program. Now I will have to figure out the Medicaid ”world,” which works much differently than the private insurers’ system, or else contest my placement in that program with Cover Oregon.

Students, the PSU plan won’t throw you such curve balls. You have an awesome, generous health plan, and you should take advantage of it before you graduate. As I’ve said before, you don’t know what you’ve got, until you lose it.

| Spring |

| Spring |

by Sierra Pruitt

Spring time always make people giddy and it’s one of the best things I get to witness during this season. Being in Portland, I absolutely love the days of sunshine because people are outside enjoying what we don’t get enough of.

But I have also came to the conclusion that we need to love the season we are in and not dwell because “summer isn’t here yet” or “school hasn’t ended.”

We all need to make the most of each day and become content with the present.

Here’s to spring, the blossoming flowers, and living in the present!

Countdown to graduation

by  Jenna Rae Tucker

…or as I have been lovingly referring to it, countdown to nothing. Here I am, a 27-year-old grad student getting ready to finish a thesis and get thrown back out into the real world. I will have more credentials and experience under my belt, but that doesn’t really make me feel any more prepared. I am getting flashbacks of being in the same position at 18 and 22. After high school I had this grand illusion that college would somehow know what I was interested in and guide me to the perfect career immediately after releasing me. This was sort of the case, but I had to work the front desk part time at a radio station, then work in promotions, before finally making it on the air, which I assumed is what I wanted to do since that is what I spent all my time doing in school.

Then I got bored and figured my grad school would help me decide what I wanted to do. And here I am, three months to go and still no dice. Maybe I will stay in media. Maybe in radio. Maybe I can get that farm with 100 dogs that I have always dreamed about. I have had five internships, been active in radio for seven years, and will shortly be acquiring a master’s degree.

Yet I am still clueless.

The countdown to nothing continues.

Are you graduating soon? Under grad, grad school, I don’t care. Give me advice!

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