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Have no fear, Fearless Fridays are here!

Blogger Profile Picture  By: Sara Kirkpatrick

As an up-and-coming professional, I’m constantly worried about my past getting in the way of my dream job. As students these fears are commonly expressed, but then quickly ignored; which is ironic because our past can be our strongest qualification. Our past, both good and bad, can lead to determining factors which help land us our dream job.

Last Friday, I was inspired by a Fearless Friday workshop, hosted by Business Associate Dean Erica Wagner: “How to turn your past into an asset.” The title for this workshop didn’t do it justice. I had no idea our own associate dean held such a genuine passion for our educational aspirations. She acknowledged students’ fears about the past with a sympathetic ear, and offered insightful, yet practical feedback.

After attending this session, I learned that our past shouldn’t be feared, but rather embraced. Wagner posed the question, “What’s your secret sauce?”  What are traits that draw people to you?  How has your past helped shape these traits? By answering these questions, students can overcome the fears that are keeping them from their dream jobs.

Takeaway Tips for Confronting your Past:

  • Don’t turn your weakness into a positive; be frank about them
  • Describe any personal growth you’ve experienced
  • Remember, everyone has a weakness – this makes you more relatable

I high recommend anyone who hasn’t attended a Fearless Friday to be fearless and attend an upcoming workshop. It was not only inspiring, but motivating and gave me insight to a different side of PSU.

See you at the next Fearless Friday:

Tabling Photo

Tabling: It’s Awkward for Everyone

Kellie Doherty

By Kellie Doherty

We all know that tabling is an awkward college life experience. People standing behind a highly decorated table, silently willing students over by expression alone. Passersby quickening their pace or looking the opposite direction just so they don’t have to deal with it. Let’s face it, it’s awkward for everyone involved. And, having recently finished a tabling session myself, I’d like to change that.

Here are some tips to deal with tabling.

For The Ones Doing the Tabling

  • Have candy (seriously, everyone loves candy)
  • Make interesting signs
  • Have easy-to-pick-up trinkets (buttons, stickers, bookmarks, pens)
  • Have a conversation instead of just a script
  • Be Warned: People will use your table as an actual table, be cool with it.

For The Ones Passing By

  • Smile if you make eye contact with a tabling person (it’s just nice)
  • If the subject matter looks interesting, stop by and chat
  • Take a bookmark, pen, or whatever trinket they have (it’ll make their day)
  • Take only one piece of candy, two at most
  • Be Warned: If you stop by a table you’re not actually interested in, it’ll probably be boring. (There I said it!) If it’s not interesting to you or to someone you know who you could pass the information along to, move along.

Following these simple tabling tricks will make it less awkward for everybody. And, seriously, everyone loves candy. Remember that, and it’ll be a success for us all.

parking portland

Portland State’s Parking Peeve


by Shezad Khan

I started driving to school about a year ago because of how much faster it was than taking the bus. Well, that and the fact that it meant I could sleep in. I never realized how hard it would be to find parking near campus. It’s near impossible after 10 AM.

This makes me question why PSU has recently been reserving parking spots, and why they’ve mostly been reserving spots for the athletics department. Those of us who drive to school are paying tuition and paying to park, so it can seem a bit unfair when we need spots to park in so that we can attend class. This also brings up the question of whether or not the university deems athletics as more important than other departments, or even more important than students who aren’t athletes.

Sometimes we drive in circles around campus for a half an hour to find parking, sometimes we get lucky and find a spot right away, and sometimes we get to a lot just to see that there are “reserved” signs on spots that we could have used. It makes me curious as to whether or not the administration at PSU knows that parking is such a big problem.

Are there any solutions to this problem? Is there anything we, as students, can do to alleviate the pressures of Portland’s growing population when it comes to parking?


What Europe is Teaching Me about Oregon

By Olivia Clarke
It’s Fall Break for universities in France, and we American students have dispersed to every corner of Europe. I’m spending the week in Frankfurt, and friends of mine are traveling in England, Ireland, the Czech Republic, Poland, Italy, and Spain. We’re all trying to soak up as much of Europe as possible during the vacation. Our weekends have been filling up, too – we’re taking trips to places like Bordeaux, Toulouse, and northern Spain whenever we get the chance. We’re in Europe, after all, and we don’t know when we’ll make it back here; therefore, it’s important to take advantage of our time on the continent by traveling as much as possible.

I’ve been enjoying these European adventures, but all of this suitcase-packing and hostel-booking has also brought a question to mind: why do we only have this attitude when we’re abroad? At home in Portland, I tend to trudge through each week with my eyes to the ground, focusing on schoolwork and spending my free time on the internet. I rarely leave the city to go on hikes or explore other parts of Oregon, let alone travel out of state. In Europe, on the other hand, I’m becoming a regular jet-setter. But it’s not as if my home country is a boring one; being away from the U.S. is making me appreciate how vast and interesting the country really is. Even in the Northwest, where travel would be easy and relatively inexpensive, there are plenty of places I haven’t explored. I could easily take a day trip to the mountains or the coast with a few friends, and after I return from Europe, I think I’ll make more time for these small adventures. My time abroad is teaching me that travel is very possible and very rewarding; by embracing Europe, I’m also learning the value of what my own region has to offer.


Halloween Thrills

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By: Xylia Lydgate

Halloween is right around the corner, and I am ecstatic.

Since I can remember, I have always celebrated the night in some fashion. As a kid, my mother would dress me up every year. She was one to believe that all Halloween costumes should be scary and would find a way to transform me into some sort of blood-thirsty vampire or haggard-looking witch; princess costumes didn’t make the cut. We would go door-to-door collecting a bag full of assorted candies and sometimes visit the neighbor’s “spooky” backyard haunt.20151029_135353 (1)

Fast forward 10 years later and Halloween is just as exciting! There are plenty of things to do for Halloween both on- and off-campus. Campus Rec gets into the frightful spirit with its popular Halloween themed event, Zombie Dodgeball. In an unearthly twist to the classic game of dodgeball, participants dress up in their wildest zombie interpretation and play several “ghoulish” matches until there is a single team champion. My co-workers and I will be forming a team ourselves and have already decided on a mix of Zombie bride, pirate, soccer player, ’80s inspired, neon themed Zombie costumes. Like most Rec Center events, this tournament is free for both PSU students and members—first come, first served.

Several days ago, PSU Housing hosted their annual Fright Night Haunted House. As a Haunted House junkie myself, I must say, this one is a lot scarier than you would expect from a University run event. However, if you’re looking for a more intense scare, Sauvie Island’s Haunted Corn Maze and Portland’s FarmHouse GhostTown Haunt attraction will not let you down. FarmHouse is Portland’s only full contact haunted house where you will be “touched, restrained, and blindfolded”— talk about intense!

Whether you plan on taking a casual stroll through downtown Portland to see an array of bizarre costumes or choose to navigate through a bone-chilling Haunted House, I wish you all a Happy Halloween!

What do you like to do for Halloween?


The Stresses of School

Written by: Jasmin Landa

Although K-12 prepares students for college academically, I don’t feel that it entirely prepares us for the transition from high school to college. I was deeply overwhelmed my first year of college. I had packed my bags and left home to enter a life that would require me to be more responsible, independent and self-supportive. But then I went through many sleepless nights, stressful days and frustrating moments before I could truly embrace this new life and continue forward.

Now that I am a sophomore, I have found a system that works for me that alleviates stress, organizes my days, and guides me through the winding road to completing my degree.

For one, I live by Google Calendar. I input all that I will be doing throughout the week, and throughout the term. It keeps me organized, so when I wake up every morning, I pull out my calendar and I see what the day holds for me.

Second, I involve myself in extracurricular activities because it allows me to network with my peers who are going through similar stressors. By being connected, we can go through it together. Also, giving some of my time to things that are outside of classroom settings allows me to relax and de-stress myself.

College is a time to appreciate, learn, and explore. How are you keeping the stresses of college organized?


Questioning the System


by Shezad Khan

Now that I’ve officially begun my career as a graduate student, I’ve been delving into some pretty interesting conversations with my cohort. A topic that was the focus of a lively discussion that took place recently was that of the “banking concept” in education. This concept essentially places teachers and professors as holders of knowledge who deposit said knowledge into students. It’s a controversial method of teaching to say the least, but sometimes education adopts iffy frameworks.

I bring this up because we should all be well aware that the education system in this country, to put it gently, isn’t the best. I’m sure that the amount of reasons for the failure of our education system is vast, but that does not mean we shouldn’t try to figure it out. Some of the problems that come from the banking concept include elitist educators, lack of student/teacher interaction, and even the fact that students are meant to be docile in terms of doing and thinking what they’re told to.

I’m interested in discussions like this because I want to become a college professor. As we go through school, day by day and week by week, it’s easy to get stuck in this cycle of doing what’s on our syllabi and getting assignments in on time. Seldom do we stop and think about what it is we’re actually doing. But I think it’s very important for us to rebel a little. By that, I don’t mean you should flip your desks and tables in a frenzy during your class. I just mean that, sometimes, it’s healthy to criticize institutions.