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The 51st Annual Nina Mae Kellogg Awards

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By Shezad Khan

If you’re looking to go to a PSU event this month, the Kellogg Awards Ceremony is just a couple of weeks away. I went to the Kellogg Awards for the first time last year when a writing professor insisted that we attend. Being an English major, I should have gone before. Not only was it a fun event to go to, three friends of mine won awards and I had no idea they were contestants.

So what are the Kellogg Awards? The awards recognize excellence in writing. There are 21 different awards for poetry, fiction, or non-fiction with prizes ranging from $100 to $2,000 – these awards are serious business! Plus winners get the recognition of winning such a great reward for their writing. The event provides a wonderful opportunity to see people from your community – from your college –achieve great things, and the event is completely free, so you should go show your support.

The ceremony is going to be held on Monday, May 18th, at 5:30 p.m. at the Native American Student and Community Center on campus, 710 SW Jackson Street. This year’s guest speaker is going to be Mike Davis who is the author of City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles.

Last year there was free food and beer! How much more motivation do you need?

(Although this event is free and open to the public, they ask that you RSVP.)

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Summer, you’re taking very long to get here!

10373989_844446705612551_3373063601715068845_nWritten By: Jasmin Landa

As slow as summer is approaching, so are my plans for that time-frame. But what I do know of my summer is that I will be spending a small portion of my time in a classroom.

Summer classes are a definite for my plans this summer not because I direly need the credits, but because I want a little cushion going into the next academic terms. And also, I am a double major and a double minor, and would like to graduate within four years. Summer session allows me to take courses that would otherwise be taken in a the regular academic terms, thus making my four-year degree goal possible.

For the most part, I want to keep my classes within the first three days of the week, allowing me to enjoy the summer weather, work a part-time job and enjoy a little bit of free-time before the school year begins.

Summer 2015 will be one to remember: My mind will be working hard in the classroom and I’ll be experiencing the wonderful adventures that summer will bring to me here in this beautiful city.

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Community Justice

By: Sharon Nellist

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The ASPSU voting  period ends today at 7:00 p.m.

On April 22 the student Judicial Review Board made a decision to re-start the 2015 ASPSU Election – and we all know why.

It came to light that one of the candidates for ASPSU president, Tony Funchess, was convicted of sodomy and attempted rape.

Funchess resigned as multicultural affairs director on April 22 but stated that he would still run for president.

Members of our community were heavily opposed to his decision and started a Facebook community  called Step down, Tony and petitioned for Funchess’ resignation in the election.

The candidates this second time around came forward April 30 – and Funchess is certainly absent from the ballot. In fact, it looks entirely different.

Do you think that ASPSU leaders handled the situation properly? Do you think the changes that they have made are for better or worse?

I am still reading through the 2015 Round 2 Voting Pamphlet, but I am certain that I will be submitting my ballot tonight. Nothing will improve or change if we do not speak up and VOTE!

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Let the Spring Light Wipe out Hate

By Chelsea Ware

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“Sometimes the Bible in the hand of one man is worse than a whisky bottle in the hand of (another)… There are just some kind of men who – who’re so busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one, and you can look down the street and see the results.”

― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Spring’s warm weather is almost here! I love spring at PSU because I can expect to enjoy sunny afternoons on the grass, music by the water front, and ice cream breaks in between classes. However, there is one aspect of warmer weather at PSU that I don’t look forward too, and that is the evangelical preachers in the park blocks. As someone who spends a lot of time of campus, I’ve come to see PSU as my home and find it jarring when I hear someone screaming intolerant, homophobic, anti-Semitic and vulgar comments so brazenly. Whenever I see the preachers in action, I usually also see a group of students crowded around them shouting back. While I too get tempted to join in and argue with the preachers, I make a firm point not too. I think that the best solution to deal with people who come to campus and bellow discriminatory views is to simply ignore them. I know it’s easier said than done, but one of the main reasons people like that come here is because they enjoy having the audience. Why do you think they mainly come when it’s warm out? They know that they will have the largest audience and be the most comfortable. They simply enjoy arguing with the students and feel a sense of power from starting drama on our campus. If they were actually interested in spreading the word and teachings of Jesus Christ (which is love, by the way) they would do it rain OR shine. They would donate to the ASPSU food pantry or help pick up litter. These are not logical Christians; therefore arguing with them will accomplish nothing. This is our campus, not theirs. To take it back we simply need to rise above their hatred by smiling and enjoying the good things that spring has to offer.

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Confessions of an Urban Gardener

By Olivia Clarke

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I first ventured into the PSU Community Garden last June, and I’ve been managing the Honors plot ever since. Thus far I’ve harvested strawberries, tomatoes, basil, and cucumbers, among other homegrown goodies.

The Community Garden is a great opportunity for PSU residents to make sustainable food choices and build community. However, I’ve encountered some downsides to having a vegetable garden on a college campus. Most residents leave for the summer, which happens to be an extremely important season for gardening. Plots get hopelessly overgrown during this season, and work that is put into the garden during the academic year is often wasted. Security issues have led to the installation of a lock, which puts a damper on the “community” vibe. I’ve also known some of my vegetables and bricks to go missing, and some plots even include homemade signs that read, “Please stop stealing our vegetables!” I find this lack of trust unfortunate in a community space.

Yet even considering these drawbacks and annoyances, I wouldn’t want to see the space used for any other purpose. Sure, college students might not be the most consistent or reliable gardeners, and the lock and the occasional theft can be irritating. The commitment to maintaining the communal spaces in the garden could definitely be higher. But for those of us who maintain our plots on a daily basis, gardening is a refreshing and rewarding addition to our college experience. It keeps us close to the earth, and it ensures that we know where our food is coming from. And what can I say? Those cherry tomatoes are delicious.

If you’d like to have your own plot in the Community Garden, just sign up here!

C.R.E.A.M.

By Teddi Faller

  
Nothing makes you feel older than when you have take a new job because of the financial benefits – like stable hours, higher pay, stocks and 401ks. I consider myself a die hard loyalist when it comes to jobs. This is probably because the first job I ever had was a dream and I was pulled kicking and screaming from it due to relocation.

After that I tried to find a similar job – and huzzah! — I succeeded. Unfortunately, retail and certain industries are suffering right now. The hours were inconsistent and the upward mobility was non-existent — no movement at all. I fell into that trap of comparing one job to another, which never ends well.

This leads to searching for new jobs even if you aren’t necessarily unhappy.

And if a new job offer comes along, you are faced with a difficult choice — stay with what you know or take a jump.

The scariest thing about putting in your two weeks’ notice is spending those next two weeks wondering if you made the right decision.

In switching jobs you:

1. Realize that you’re comfortable in your job
2. Realize how awful it is to be new at a job
3. Realize how much you like your coworkers
4. Realize how much you might not like your new coworkers
5. Wonder whether you made the right choice

Life is made of hard choices. Moments like these remind me that I am, in fact, a grownup. When staring student loans in the face, and the potential consequences that your loans might have on your future spouse — extra grown-up points? — career choices became more “what can I afford” rather than sticking with something that’s comfortable.

I suppose the takeaway from all this is simply to take risks when we’re young, so that when we’re older we can chase our dreams knowing we’re taken care of.

“Dorm Jealousy”

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By: Zaira Carranza

Since coming to Portland State University, I have made many friends that live in campus dorms. I can’t help but be a little jealous because living in the dorms would make my life way easier. One of my friend lives on the 10th floor of the Ondine. She has the most amazing view of Portland from her room. I always go visit her to take naps. She has one roommate and two suitemates whom she shares the bathroom and kitchenette with. The dorms are more spacious than I’d expected and you can decorate it as you please. My friend keeps hers very clean and minimalistic. Some of downsides of living in the dorms are being homesick and having to deal with roommates on stressful days. Other than that they are super convenient, and I can’t wait to one day experience dorm life.