Occupy This.

As a student, I am surrounded by many opinions on many issues and policies. Because Portland State is an urban campus with many students who are older than traditional students at other universities, we tend to get more protests than other campuses.

However, I tend to feel more like an observer and spectator than a participant.  The groups and people who organize these events have their own agenda and more than anything, they feel strongly about their cause and have a strong bond with their fellow members.

Occupy Portland started a couple weeks ago, and to my amazement, it is still going on. I remember the first day clearly: I kept noticing helicopters in the sky. I paid no attention and continued walking. They kept circling as if filming for TV news. I contacted a friend, and she told me to come down to the Wells Fargo Building downtown. I met up with her at and as we continued north, a huge rally came into the picture.

The sheer number of people was staggering, and the fact that so many people came together for the same cause was great. Once I was in the middle of the hurricane if you will, I was immersed into the whole movement.

The main reason for the rally was to protest corporate greed and to fight for equality and justice for all workers. What caught my attention was the diversity and companionship among the protesters. Caucasians, African American, Hispanics, Asians, the whole spectrum of people who were unified for the same cause. Greed at the cooperate or personal level is shunned upon. I have been to a few protests with a specific group of people, with a specific goal, but this one was different because it applies to everyone nationwide.

Were you at this rally?  Do you agree or disagree with Occupy Portland?

4 thoughts on “Occupy This.

  1. Emily says:

    I like the idea of the occupy movement, but at this point I feel they are stagnant and not accomplishing anything but a bunch of marching, talking and weed smoking. It may make you feel better, but no change is happening and the middle/working class is being alienated. It needs to get fixed before it’s too late and the movement looses all hope of support from the full 99%

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