A Novel Concept

I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember, but I recall really starting to get into it as a hobby around the sixth grade. I keenly remember being confident that I’d have at least one novel done by the time I was eighteen, maybe twenty if I was busy as an adult. It definitely makes me laugh to look back on my perspective at that point! My dream career has always been to be a therapist, but I really want to pursue my writing on the side, and being a novelist in the future is an important part of my identity.

     I’ve entertained several different novel ideas, but the first one I settled to work on has been time-consuming, stressful, and tough. But I’m so in love with the process and project. Crafting a story that has strong female characters, a complex setting that tackles tough issues, and equally funny and heartbreaking moments is one of the best things in the world to work on.  I’m about fifty thousand words into what I’m aiming to be a hundred thousand word first draft. It feels really weird to be so far into a project, as I’ve written many short stories but never something this long and complex. The biggest challenge is finding the time and energy to work on it. Sometimes, I have unorthodox weeks where I write ten thousand words, and sometimes weeks go by with nothing new. Often, my time to write is after I get home and after a long day of classes, work, and sports, I’ve still got to do homework and make dinner. I’m usually drained. It’s tough, as I remember wanting to be done with my first novel at eighteen, and I’m twenty-one and only halfway through the first draft. But I’m persistent and trying to be more realistic about my time and energy. I’m passionate about it and know that I’ll get there eventually! I’ve got a couple other novel ideas now, and even tried competing in a writing competition again for the first time in years, and my success has been really encouraging. Hopefully you’ll see my books on the shelves one day!

Roof With a View

The fact that the city is filled with numerous food carts is one of my favorite things about Portland. Predictably, since starting at PSU, they’ve become slightly dangerous for my paycheck. The wealth of options for lunch and quick snacks around campus is really tempting. I find myself most often visiting the food cart pod on Fourth Avenue, hunting gyros or beef kebabs over saffron rice. It’s really amazing to be able to sample so many different cultures and try things that I ordinarily wouldn’t. Persian food was always in my rotation when I was younger but I hadn’t really found a good spot again when I moved away from my hometown. Luckily, there’s many Persian food carts around Portland — and they’re all mouthwatering. I was worried about having the same quality of Mexican food coming from California, but you guessed it, there’s multiple incredibly delicious food carts for that. Satisfying my desire to eat sushi as often and as on the go as possible? There’s a sushi burrito food cart for that! 

I still haven’t tried everything in the pod and around campus but it’s definitely on my to-do list by the end of the year. After an hour-long process to finally decide which cart to sample, the only decision left to make is where to enjoy my bounty. I am a proud and careful lunch-spot hunter. I like being somewhere semi-quiet and with a spectacular view. I haven’t been disappointed at all by PSU’s campus, and the downtown buildings have conjured a new option — a rooftop lunch. The best view I’ve found has to be on the fifth floor of the Academic Student Recreation Center. It’s nothing short of breathtaking to be able to see the changing fall colors and almost all of campus. I highly recommend checking it out if you haven’t before! It may be getting pretty cold, but I’m excited to see the changing colors of all the trees as the year goes by.

Getting Active

I used to play a lot of sports, but stopped playing in high school for various reasons before an injury put all sports on hold. I’ve played soccer, tennis, lacrosse, and volleyball, and really enjoyed all of them. I knew I wanted to get more active again, and hoped to find something that worked with my schedule and body. But I’m not the biggest fan of the gym so it was difficult for me to find consistent motivation to workout when I’m already on campus from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day — at least — and then tired and laden with homework by the time I get home.

       During a brief PSU stint in 2016, I played intramural volleyball, and was really grateful for the experience to play on a team at a higher-performing level. With that experience in mind, I checked out Night at the Rec at the beginning of the term and signed up for a bunch of different clubs that looked interesting. One of the only ones that worked with my schedule — and happened to seem the most open to clueless players — was women’s ultimate frisbee. I actually felt more insecure about continuing a sport I knew how to play because I hadn’t played in a long time, so something new it was! 

I was really nervous about it, but made myself go to the first practice, and ended up falling in love with it! There were a lot of new people and we have all caught on pretty quickly. Everyone is very kind and encouraging of one another, and it’s thrilling thinking about playing in tournaments representing PSU. Playing ultimate has kept me really active and has served as that motivation I was looking for. I find myself trying to be in shape to be a better player on the field. There’s also a profound sense of community at practices — especially when we’re doing ab workouts and all suffering together.

I’d encourage everyone to try out a club or sport if you’re thinking about it. You’re especially welcome at women’s ultimate!

Transfer Students Need to Stick Together

Thinking about transferring from Portland Community College to Portland State University, I had always felt exuberant and confident. Unfortunately, in the spring term of last year, my nerves about transferring had begun to swamp my excitement. I felt inferior to the other juniors who had spent their first two years at PSU, learning where the best study spots were and which elevators wouldn’t take an eon to reach the fourth floor in Cramer Hall. 

I knew that I would learn it all in time, but the feeling that I was playing catch-up still bothered me — especially as someone who considers feeling ahead of the game to be part of their personality. 

PSU was a much bigger campus than I was used to, with more resources, buildings and people. I was thrilled to begin taking upper division classes and starting to study some really fascinating stuff in preparation for my dream career, but it simultaneously seemed to loom over me like a mountain I wouldn’t be able to climb. I was incredibly nervous, but I made myself go to one of the Viking Days events — the transfer student happy hour. It turned out to be wildly fun, I got to demonstrate my prowess at trivia, and I got the sense that a lot of other people there also were nervous about starting school. It was nice to feel that I wasn’t alone, something which I knew rationally but still needed to see demonstrated to feel better.

 I’m learning the ins and outs of PSU pretty fast. Transfer students blend in pretty well with the rest of the crowd, but there are still resources to distinguish us and our different experiences. I haven’t checked out the new Transfer Student Resource Center in Fariborz Maseeh Hall, but I am curious about stopping by. I think in the future more events specifically aimed at transfer students would be a great idea — because we’re all out there, but finding and holding on to one another is really helpful!