Tuition Cash for Clothes

By Emma Eberhart

Portland State students are facing a 5% or more increase in tution, and this is at least the third year in a row that we’ve seen tuition raised at the university. Most students already have a hard enough time paying tuition as it is and are likely to struggle further with this most recent increase.

In order to help pay for school in the fall, I’ve been trying every which way to earn money – my most successful venture has been cleaning out my closet. Since the majority of my work experience has been in retail and thrifting is a favorite pastime, I have accumulated quite the wardrobe. Keeping only the pieces I absolutely love and wear frequently and parting with the rest, I have been able to cut down on clutter and earn some extra cash.

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By making accounts on apps like Depop and Mercari and just posting my clothes on social media, I have had pretty good luck getting the most for my clothes! Both Depop
and Mercari let you upload pictures of your stuff, describe them, price them, and then let the other members all over the world shop from your closet! The picture to the right is what my page on Depop looks

 

like – super straightforward and easy to setup. It’s really simple and all are protected for safe selling and buying. These apps take only 10% of what you sell your items for. There are, of course, other options that are near campus where you can sell your gently used clothes. Stores like Crossroads and Buffalo Exchange will pay you for your things. However, they take a much larger percentage – close to 70%.

I’m definitely not looking forward to paying more for college, but if the tuition hike has done anything for me it’s decluttered my apartment.

Long Distance Friends

When I chose to go out of state for college, I realized I would be pretty far from home – specifically 1,355.6 miles away. I was excited for the adventure of a new city, for finding my niche, and most of all for it not being in 115 degrees Fahrenheit on any given summer day. However, one aspect that I did not fully think through was just how far I would be from my best friend.13327342_10204472701376747_137003542457597024_n Vivian and I went to the same high school in Gilbert, Arizona, and our similar interests and love for Mac Demarco and Ezra Koenig brought us together. The rest is essentially history. Vivian stayed in Arizona after graduating while I moved to the great Pacific Northwest.

My first year away consisted of a lot of facetime calls complaining about my rain-soaked sneakers, texts about current happenings in our lives, and lengthy phone calls discussing details, no matter how small, of our everyday lives. The facetimes, texts, and phone calls made possible by modern technology definitely helped our friendship stay close despite the distance that keeps us apart.

Our friendship is still going strong, but being long-distance BFFs is definitely challenging at times. Those 1,355.6 miles don’t seem to exist while texting, but the IMG_1162birthdays and special occasions that are missed suck, but it does make the ones where we are able to be there for each other that much more special.

It’s now my second, almost third, year in Portland and being so far away from family and friends has not gotten any easier, but it has made my time away from school that much more exciting. (Also who doesn’t need a reason for vacation?)

Don’t Press Snooze on Summer

By Emma Eberhart

Last summer, I voluntarily chose to give up the ability to press snooze on my alarm, so I could instead spend my mornings in a classroom, and to be honest I would do it again.

The summer quarter at Portland State generally offers both the usual 10-week course and the occasional accelerated four-week course that condenses the curriculum to a shorter amount of time but meets more than the common two times a week. Courses are worth the same amount of credit hours regardless of whether they last 10 weeks or four, so you can pick a class that works best with your schedule, which is really great. The class I took was an accelerated course—a length I would choose again since it left a majority of my summer with no looming school deadlines.

Another positive aspect of taking summer courses, I found, is that the professors are teaching fewer classes, which means that they have fewer students to focus on. This is not to say that during the other quarters, professors care less, but they have given me more constructive help and have been more engaged during summer term.

The only downside is there are fewer courses offered because fewer students sign up.

If you can find a class that is offered in the summer that works with your schedule and is necessary for you to graduate, I would advise you to take it. Any and all opportunities that get you closer to graduating are worth it.

Scheduling Spring

Through and through I am a planner. I live for organization and tidiness. Arranging objects via color, alphabetically, by size or shape gets me ridiculously excited. I view my love for organization as a strength; however, it is definitely also a weakness because I allow little room for sudden changes.

This spring term I may or may not have committed myself to one too many things. And by one too many things, I definitely mean like five or six. Despite spreading myself far too thin, I am determined to fulfill all of my commitments and do so with grace, ease, and the aid of caffeine. I am determined to schedule all of my time down to the minute and stick to it.

In order to manage 20 credit hours for school, two part-time jobs, and my personal life I am heavily relying on the amazing trifecta of: bullet journaling, to-do lists, and calendar apps. Bullet journaling and organizing your time and efforts can definitely be overwhelming, but I have found it is very much worth the stress.

If you’re looking for any organization inspiration, I recommend a Google or Tumblr search for “studyblr,” which is full of beautiful photos of color coded notes and schedules and charts and a whole lot of other stuff artistically organized.

Food for Thought

By Emma Eberhart

The cliche college student is one who is constantly busy, caffeine fueled, and swimming in homework. However, it should also be added that college students are also hungry. Yes, they are hungry for knowledge, but also for food. A growing trend among college campuses is student hunger, and it is likely to continue as tuition increases with no end in site.

A lot of universities, all over this nation, have resources available for students who are in need, and Portland State is no exception. Here at PSU we have both a food pantry and a fresh fruit and vegetable program known as “Harvest Share” that is available to students, staff, and faculty in need. The food pantry is located in the basement of Smith Memorial Student Union, open from 12-2 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Harvest Share is a program in partnership with the Oregon Food Bank that occurs the second Monday of every month at noon and generally goes until 1:30 p.m. It happens rain or shine, outside of Shattuck Hall on the PSU campus, and the line tends to start around an hour prior or so. Both programs are made possible by the Committee for Improving Student Food Security.

These resources exist for those in need, but continue because of those who volunteer their time and energy to make them happen. The Harvest Share is always in need of volunteers, and as a bonus you get first pick of the crop! Below I’ve put the link to their page where you can sign up for volunteering and learn more about the program.

Harvest Share Info and Volunteering: https://www.pdx.edu/student-access-center/harvest-share

 

Portland gets Shot! (by me)

By Emma Eberhart

One of my favorite pastimes is photography — specifically film photography — and lucky for me Portland, Oregon is absolutely stunning in film. Below are some of my favorite shots that I have taken of buildings here in Portland. All of the photos are taken with a Canon AE-1 Program in 35 mm colored film.

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Montgomery Court, Portland State campus in the fall

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Apartment complex downtown, featuring the rare sight of sunshine and blue skies

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Apartment building on NW 23rd Ave

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Apartment building on NW 23rd Ave

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“No Fun” Bar on SE Hawthorne Blvd

Portland Snowpocalypse 2017

By Emma Eberhart

As we all know this Winter Term is off to quite an interesting start; well “start” may not be the best term to use. This winter storm hit, and it hit hard. Below are some photos from, what I am calling, “The Portland Snowpocalypse of 2017.”

 

screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-4-11-58-pmTuesday night I had the bright idea of going to Ikea for some apartment necessities. The snow started as we headed home, and I’m fairly confident we spent more time driving back to downtown than we spent at the store.

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In between snowfalls Tuesday night, I went for a walk. It seemed as if every tree branch in downtown was covered with a blanket of snow. The entire city was eerily quiet, most definitely an unnerving calm.

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At one point on Wednesday a couple of pals and myself attempted to clear the path for our car with pots and pans, but were not successful with our endeavors.

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All in all – I was not impressed with the white flurry and do not recommend attempting to do anything other than cozy up indoors.