PSU Vanguard Bridges Campus Gaps

Screen Shot 2017-12-01 at 3.31.14 PM By Andrew Jankowski

Portland State University is a unique college in that it is a commuter college in the heart of downtown Portland with a vibrant on-campus community. Off-campus students are within walking distance of PSU buildings, or they drive from out of town or even out of state. Whether we are immigrants, refugees, natives or nationals, we together make PSU a diverse community.

Sometimes, though, on campus we develop insular communities that don’t interact with each other. It’s normal. Think about it: engineering students, how often have you attended an art reception at one of PSU’s six art galleries? Art students, how often have you attended a history lecture? History students, how often do you attend literary events? English majors, how often do we attend science lectures? And how often do we engage with cultural resource centers that don’t center on our identities? And truly, for that matter, who is attending sports events or voting for ASPSU?

Portland State Vanguard, PSU’s de-facto journalism program, is a learning lab that connects students of all majors and ideological viewpoints in the common goal of informing PSU students, as well as our non-student community partners like city hall and local professional journalists, about events that impact their lives. We’ve done it for over 70 years, and now that we’re in control of our own distribution, we’re now on racks and tables in almost every PSU building, and a few off-campus spots like McMenamins, Pizzacato and University Pointe. Based on our print circulation, social media interactions and story comments on our site, more of you are picking up papers or clicking on our content to find out what’s affecting campus. Even more encouraging, when I’ve heard that print is dying for almost two decades, we’ve seen a surge in contributors for writing, photography and videography.

The best part is, we’re still seeking new people to come aboard. We’re now hiring for most of our editorial staff (hiring as in money!), and we’re always seeking contributors for #VikingVoices, our op-ed section open to whatever you’re passionate about in 600 words or less. We recently featured one of our ASPSU senator’s letters as a dialogue for how to engage students on campus and have talks about ideologies we may disagree with personally.

Perks of working at PSU Vanguard include:

  • An impressive addition to your resume.
  • A fast way to develop a comprehensive writing, photography, video, design and/or art portfolio.
  • Connection to numerous professional, academic and social circles, including ASPSU, campus clubs & student groups, resource centers, city hall, CPSO, and more.
  • Opportunities to interview celebrities, elected officials and public figures.
  • Meeting people who can become important professional contacts or really close personal friends.

Breaking the Habit of Not Creating

THUMBNIALS -5 By Emma Josephson

During my freshman year at Portland State, I struggled with adapting to the insane balancing act of school, work, social life, and just being able to take a break. It’s the middle of fall term of my sophomore year and things are a lot better. The entirety of last year, I felt like I wasn’t doing enough and committing to too much all at the same time. One of the only things that kept me motivated was knowing that other new students were trying to figure it all out as well.

As a film major and a creative person in general, there was an added level of imbalance in my life. I stopped creating just for the sake of creating, and I found myself feeling like my passion was being transformed into just a grade. I love being able to use my talent and love of film to work on these less creative projects, but my mistake was not prioritizing my own personal creative growth. Anytime I can spend focusing on a video that I have complete creative control over is so important and valuable to me. For months I felt stuck in a cycle of not having time and I didn’t want to feel that way for any longer. So I just started creating.

This video is 100% me. It’s the memories I’ve made with friends and family and some of the places I’ve been in the past months. I’m still trying to transition out of this “funk.” Hopefully, people can relate to this short film/compilation of my life this past year, even if their struggle is not the exact same as mine. I know it’s just difficult to balance your other passions in life with being a student and managing all the others things that come up.

The VideoBreaking the Habit of Not Creating

 

Women & Apologies

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By: Sara Kirkpatrick 

Did you know women have more connectability between the left and right brain? This biological skill has naturally armed women with the ultimate advantage of engaging both sides of the brain: the analytical left and the creative right brain — amazing!

However, as this skill offers many social advantages, it also increases sensitivity to emotions and in turn creates an increased need to apologize, sometimes in situations where an apology is not necessary. This has been notably detrimental for women professionals in today’s workforce.

After viewing a YouTube video on this phenomenon in my summer Business Ethics (BA385) course, I found myself constantly falling victim to the phrase, “I’m sorry.” However, most of my alleged “infractions” for which I apologized were not infractions at all, they were merely apologies for simply going about my business in ways that were absolutely necessary. Whether it is taking a seat in class a few seconds before someone else was hoping to sit down, asking a necessary question of a colleague or peer who had the answer or carrying out other similar tasks and functions that allow me to successfully get through the day, I had subconsciously equipped myself with a canned apology waiting breathlessly to be delivered.

As women and young professionals who will soon be entering, or who are already in the workplace, we need to acknowledge this issue and eliminate our impulsive need to apologize. If we do not eliminate this subconscious affliction, it may impact our future employment opportunities. We could place ourselves at risk by not being taken seriously, or even worse, we could become overlooked by employers for an opening in a company or for a promotion to a managerial role.

Rather than falling victim to this rising issue, let’s embrace it! I encourage all of my PSU female peers to insert the #SorryNotSorry trend into their daily thoughts, interactions, and lifestyle. Let’s use it as a way to empower and solidify our future roles within the workplace of today!

Long Distance Friends

When I chose to go out of state for college, I realized I would be pretty far from home – specifically 1,355.6 miles away. I was excited for the adventure of a new city, for finding my niche, and most of all for it not being in 115 degrees Fahrenheit on any given summer day. However, one aspect that I did not fully think through was just how far I would be from my best friend.13327342_10204472701376747_137003542457597024_n Vivian and I went to the same high school in Gilbert, Arizona, and our similar interests and love for Mac Demarco and Ezra Koenig brought us together. The rest is essentially history. Vivian stayed in Arizona after graduating while I moved to the great Pacific Northwest.

My first year away consisted of a lot of facetime calls complaining about my rain-soaked sneakers, texts about current happenings in our lives, and lengthy phone calls discussing details, no matter how small, of our everyday lives. The facetimes, texts, and phone calls made possible by modern technology definitely helped our friendship stay close despite the distance that keeps us apart.

Our friendship is still going strong, but being long-distance BFFs is definitely challenging at times. Those 1,355.6 miles don’t seem to exist while texting, but the IMG_1162birthdays and special occasions that are missed suck, but it does make the ones where we are able to be there for each other that much more special.

It’s now my second, almost third, year in Portland and being so far away from family and friends has not gotten any easier, but it has made my time away from school that much more exciting. (Also who doesn’t need a reason for vacation?)

You Still Have to Vote


by Andrew D. Jankowski

Like most Americans, I’m sure the word election induces visceral reaction, like remembering exactly what and how much you drank last night. Yet . . . did you know there is an election happening on the PSU campus right now?

The Associated Students of Portland State University (ASPSU) is basically the student council of college. The Portland State Vanguard (where I am currently the online & social media editor) has recently written about ASPSU’s functions and how they serve on and off campus students. Even though the president and vice president are running unopposed this year (as, basically, as the senators and Student Fee Committee candidates), your participation still matters.

For example, there are diverse, highly qualified Senator or Student Fee Committee candidates, only some of whom actively participated in the debate process. Maybe some of these candidates are your friends, maybe you have argued with some of these people on the internet, maybe you’ve never heard of any of them before, but the fact of the matter is they play a major role in how your student incidental fees are spent, which in turn affects what kind of programs, resources and clubs PSU can offer.

Whether you’re upset with how Donald Trump & Co. are running the country or not, it’s still important to make your voice heard and engage with everyone else who was on the ballot and won in 2016. Whether you’re an ASPSU cheerleader, a sharp critic of the outgoing/current administration, or are just now tuning into the workings of PSU student government, this kind of civic discourse is important, both for the candidates and you.

(There’s also an election going on in Multnomah County on May 16, and as I’m fortunate enough to live in walking distance of the voter’s office, I’ll probably walk my ballot down this year, weather permitting.)

For more information on ASPSU candidates, their platforms, and what has gone on this year, visit psuvanguard.com and feel free to leave comments on any stories that resonate.

To vote, visit http://elections.aspsu.pdx.edu/ by May 3 and use your ODIN to log in.

Don’t Press Snooze on Summer

By Emma Eberhart

Last summer, I voluntarily chose to give up the ability to press snooze on my alarm, so I could instead spend my mornings in a classroom, and to be honest I would do it again.

The summer quarter at Portland State generally offers both the usual 10-week course and the occasional accelerated four-week course that condenses the curriculum to a shorter amount of time but meets more than the common two times a week. Courses are worth the same amount of credit hours regardless of whether they last 10 weeks or four, so you can pick a class that works best with your schedule, which is really great. The class I took was an accelerated course—a length I would choose again since it left a majority of my summer with no looming school deadlines.

Another positive aspect of taking summer courses, I found, is that the professors are teaching fewer classes, which means that they have fewer students to focus on. This is not to say that during the other quarters, professors care less, but they have given me more constructive help and have been more engaged during summer term.

The only downside is there are fewer courses offered because fewer students sign up.

If you can find a class that is offered in the summer that works with your schedule and is necessary for you to graduate, I would advise you to take it. Any and all opportunities that get you closer to graduating are worth it.

Scheduling Spring

Through and through I am a planner. I live for organization and tidiness. Arranging objects via color, alphabetically, by size or shape gets me ridiculously excited. I view my love for organization as a strength; however, it is definitely also a weakness because I allow little room for sudden changes.

This spring term I may or may not have committed myself to one too many things. And by one too many things, I definitely mean like five or six. Despite spreading myself far too thin, I am determined to fulfill all of my commitments and do so with grace, ease, and the aid of caffeine. I am determined to schedule all of my time down to the minute and stick to it.

In order to manage 20 credit hours for school, two part-time jobs, and my personal life I am heavily relying on the amazing trifecta of: bullet journaling, to-do lists, and calendar apps. Bullet journaling and organizing your time and efforts can definitely be overwhelming, but I have found it is very much worth the stress.

If you’re looking for any organization inspiration, I recommend a Google or Tumblr search for “studyblr,” which is full of beautiful photos of color coded notes and schedules and charts and a whole lot of other stuff artistically organized.