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ORGANIZE! And I’m not talking about clutter.

img_4878 By Emma Eberhart

In the wake of last week’s presidential election, now is the time to organize for social justice. Organize, in this context, means coordinating with others to take action or plan events for a better and more just America.

Below are links to some local Portland groups that have been around awhile, or are just starting up, and anyone can join. Click on their name and it will take you to their Facebook page!

  1. Portland Rising Tide
  2. Rose City Antifa
  3. Marilyn Buck Abolitionist Collective
  4. Portland Tenants United
  5. Socialist Alternative Portland
  6. Portland State International Socialist Organization
  7. Don’t Shoot Portland
  8. Anyone’s Resistance

A united front is the only way that we will successfully stand against Trump and stand for an inclusive America – one that does not allow for racism, misogyny, and homophobia to exist without resistance.

Check out these local groups and how they are taking steps to combat bigotry here in Portland.

*Featured Image is from Anyone’s Resistance Facebook*

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Millenials Learned Nothing From John Hughes

 

img_4856 by Steph Holton

I’m a millennial and I don’t know how to date.

But I’m also a film minor who puts way too much stock in the “art imitates life” concept, and I want to know who the onscreen-dating-dynamic of the ‘80s was imitating! Because apparently dating now is in no way as simple as when John Hughes was directing Judd Nelson and Molly Ringwald.

Characters in “The Breakfast Club” didn’t have to navigate Tinder (or Match or Bumble or any of the numerous others), and dating in the movies almost always happens within the more or less reliable confines of high school where participants have considerably fewer responsibilities than college students. As students at PSU, most of us not only have school, but work and extra-curriculars, not to mention family and friends to fit into our schedules. And then to top that off with attempting to find someone to give you warm fuzzies – worrying about ‘the right way’ to go about doing so? Is anyone else floundering out there? We don’t ask each other to “go steady.” Hell, we can’t even change our Facebook relationship statuses because that’s so 2010.

So what are the rules?

What I’ve finally come to realize in this millennial world of ours is that even though we’re doing things differently (the trademark of our wonderfully weird, often frustrating, brilliantly innovative generation), there were never any rules. I’ve come to realize that even though we don’t swap letterman jackets anymore, there’s still no right way or perfect time to ‘become official,’ or meet the parents, or hit any other relationship milestone. Every relationship is unique, and no matter how you met or what the current culture may deem the right way to go about it, it ultimately comes down to the feelings of the individuals involved, and that’s something that transcends generations.

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Getting my Shroom on and you can too

By Emma Eberhart

One of my favorite things about being an out-of-state student at Portland State is the fact that I am making a brand new city my own. Exploring this uncharted territory was difficult at first, until I realized the key was right at my fingertips: Facebook.

The social-media network made it easy to map out this new world by means of adding new friends, finding interesting events, inspecting local calendars, and liking various Portland-associated pages.

Below are five, upcoming public events in Portland that I found on my Facebook ‘s recommended, popular, and/or suggested events page that some of y’all might be interested in:

  1. “2016 Fall Mushroom Show”

Sunday, October 30, noon, World Forestry Center, 4033 SW Canyon Rd., $3 for students. It’s about shrooms of all sorts with vendors, samples, books, and experts.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1826157264296217/

  1. “2016 Women in Science Mixer at OMSI”

Monday, November 2,, $5 for students (admission can be waived for those in need) required RSVP. OMSI is at the base of the eastern side of the Tilikum Bridge.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1759084991000263/

  1. “Imperialism, War, & the Fight for a Socialist Future”

Thursday, November 3, 7 p.m., on campus and is free! (Their lectures are usually in Smith, but the exact room is TBD so check in on the link) It is definitely a timely lecture considering that this election has revealed a lot of discontent with our two-party system.

https://www.facebook.com/events/596041493912661/

  1. “Portland – Fill Your Pantry”

Sunday, November 6, 11 a.m., Rigler Elementary, 5401 NE Prescott, local apples, honey, chicken and so much more sold in bulk or pre-ordered online.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1759527647667617

  1. “Portland Green Festival Expo”

December 9-11, Oregon Convention Center, 777 NE Martin Luther King, free admission to tons of vendors, speakers, and veggie food options.

https://www.facebook.com/events/803395863125279/

I hope this very brief list of events helps to get you thinking about becoming a more active member in our Portland community.

 

 

 

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“Nothing” Time

IMG_2069 by Steph Holton

The more dependent our generation becomes on technology and the more we expect everything to be instantaneous, the more I see and read about the need to maintain a healthy lifestyle by unplugging and even meditating every day. In health articles, this advice usually follows statements acknowledging the hefty responsibilities we all seem to have added to our plates. Said articles then go on to say that the more time we’ve committed to productivity of whatever kind, the more we need to carve out time to do nothing. And while I’m not here to say that advice is wrong – I certainly agree with the logic of it – I am here to say What time?

I’ve tried to do this, I really have. But I’ve found that stopping everything – pushing aside other activities in an attempt to be calmer – only gives me time to think about all the things I could be doing, and it leads to even more anxiety. But the big point, I think, is that we’re supposed to give our brains a break; we’re on hyper-drive all the time, because our brains don’t count after-work/school iPhone scrolling and Netflix watching as relaxing.

Yet as someone who really cannot sit and do nothing, I’ve still managed to find my meditation. I honestly believe that consistent exercise keeps me sane despite my insane schedule. Whether it’s hiking, or going for a run, or hitting one of my favorite Group X classes at Campus Rec, I always feel decompressed afterwards, and the prospect of making it to the gym always makes a tough day go a little better. So, I’ll be an advocate for those of us who want to live a healthy lifestyle but for whom nothing just isn’t in the cards. I think it’s okay to say “that’s not for me.” Just as long as you find your meditation.

Picture above: My own meditation, Saint Mary’s Lookout, Stevensville, MT; hike to 9,300 feet.

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Is it OK to Randomly Hit On Women On Campus?

By Jesse Turner

A few weeks ago, I was walking to my car from class. It was 6p.m. and still light outside. I was walking by the science building when a man who seemed to be in his mid 30s came up and asked me if he could walk and talk with me. I hesitated, thinking he was one of the many canvassers I see on campus. I asked him why he wanted to walk with me. He said that he had time, he was lonely, wanted to make new friends, etc. I did not believe him and I was afraid to say no outright, so instead I tried to discourage him by saying I was in a hurry and just walking to my car. He started walking with me anyway. Another woman saw this interaction and how uncomfortable I was, and she spoke up: “I’ve seen you approaching a lot of people around here.” Appreciative of her actions, I tried to walk away quickly while he was distracted. But he caught up to me.

I told him I was sorry he felt lonely but that approaching random women on the street was not the best way to make friends. “I don’t know who you are or anything about you, it’s kind of a scary situation to be randomly approached,” I insisted. He insisted back that he was not a dangerous guy and that he totally understands women and their fears (here’s a tip; saying “I’m not dangerous” while following a woman to her car is not reassuring). He had an argument for every reason I gave him that this was a terrible idea, which just made me more defensive. Finally, I told him outright: “You do not understand my fears, if you did, you would not be following me. You would have taken the hint.”

We finally got to my parking garage, and I told him to stop following me, not wanting him to see my car. Just like I expected, he asked for my number so he could take me out.

This blog is not about bragging that I got hit on. And no, this situation would not have been different if I was attracted to this guy. This blog is about the fact that this guy’s desire to follow me, talk to me, and ask for my number does not trump my desire to feel safe and be left alone. His arguments that humans should be able to talk to one another and be able to meet people this way, are BS. You have never made a best friend by approaching a random person on the street, so don’t put your fake burden on me.

So, when should you randomly hit on someone on the street who does not want to talk to you? Never. It’s scary and unnerving. Do not do it.

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Thoughts From the Walk-Out

IMG_2069 by Steph Holton

“We want real diversity, not a police state university.” This was the first of many chants taken up by the group of walk-out participants stationed on the Millar Library steps last Tuesday afternoon. Members of PSUSU sported shirts reading #DisarmPSU because Black Lives Matter. One speaker announced, “We are here fighting oppression.” Another claimed that “the police are a tool of capitalism used to oppress people.” Roughly 150 students joined in the cheering and chanting, and a few dozen stood on the outskirts observing but not participating.

After learning that I don’t support the Disarm PSU movement, a member of PSUSU asked if I supported protesting the way the administration instated armed campus safety officers. Like most of the other students I have spoken to, I am frustrated by the way the administration seems to ignore student opinion. However, I think it’s easy to overlook the fact that arming CPSO was not a light decision. Some things to consider:

  1. Portland State University is a completely open, public university in the heart of downtown, which experiences the daily movement of 30,000 students. For all of the unique and completely rad aspects about this environment that we students love, it carries very real safety concerns.
  2. Our armed CPSO are fully trained and sworn police officers who have a sworn obligation to keep the public and their fellow officers safe. They carry guns only for the defense of themselves and others. Using weapons is considered only in the face of a lethal threat. No officer wants to pull the trigger.
  3. Arming CPSO does not impact student diversity. Fighting institutionalized racism is a necessity, but I believe the way to do this in our own community is to create bonds of mutual respect and trust between the student body and CPSO. CPSO was not established, and does not operate, for the purpose of discrimination.

But what do you think? One could debate this matter endlessly. Gun safety is a very real issue, but it is also very complex, and it’s entirely separate from our dissatisfaction as students with the procedures of the administration.

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Senior Capstone: 1 step closer to saying peace out, PSU

portfolio2 By Amanda Katz

Hey there!

Long time, no blog!

I had taken a break from blogging for a while to focus on my major, but now I’m back and better than ever.

This summer is looking to be a good one. I’m in the middle of applying for summer internships, I’m getting some really cool opportunities at work, and I’m taking my senior capstone. I’m going to be doing the GirlPower! Capstone with Sally Eck, it seems like a great way to give back and I get to work with some awesome young ladies in the process!

It’ll be so nice to take the time to get my capstone done. You see, I’m at the end of my fourth year with only 21 credits left: six for my capstone, three for an internship, and the other 12 will finish out my degree. PSU has such a wide variety of summer capstones available over the summer, making it easy to pick something you’re interested in. Also, it is extremely convenient that courses are available at a range of times and days. If it wasn’t for the option to take summer classes like my capstone, either my last term at Portland State would be extremely stressful, or I’d have to wait till winter term to graduate.

I’m ready to be done with school and start working, and being able to take summer classes is allowing me to achieve my goals at my rate and on my timeline. What are your plans for summer?