“How to make good friends in school 101”

By Wiwin Hartini

I transferred from Clark College last year, and my first term at PSU was overwhelming. I was still adjusting to the longer commute, and my classes were more difficult. Making friends posed the biggest challenge.

Coming from a society where most of your peers are your age has a disadvantage. I did not know how to interact with people from more diverse backgrounds such as returning students who also work. I did not know how to make friends. I was too shy to start conversations with people, and I decided to just go home after my classes. I really want to share how it all started to change.

I learned to make good friends on campus by being involved, working on campus, participating in clubs, creating a study group, and volunteering. I started working on campus as a tutor during my second term at PSU, and it has allowed me to grow as a student. I learn from the students I meet and my coworkers as well. I worked for PSU Capital Projects & Construction as student support. It taught me about the history of each building at PSU, which I always enjoy sharing with my friends when I am giving them a tour.

One way to find “study buddies” is to actually start sitting down with different groups of students who are working on homework. I did not do this until I started taking power engineering classes where labs are part of the class. I had to talk with my peers and started getting to know their studying styles. Now, I usually study in the power engineering lab with my friends. 

When it comes to volunteering, there are many organizations or events that are always in need of volunteers. I volunteered once at a different university for the MESA event to help an Intel employee who was giving a presentation about the supply chain. From this event, I got to know the presenter a little bit, and we are actually working on inviting him to PSU to give a presentation to PSU students. Volunteering not only allowed me to meet other people but also to learn from their experiences.

I would also say that students should have the ability to make their college experience fun in their own way. It’s beneficial to define and write down what one wants out of college. I love studying the technical knowledge related to Electrical Engineering, but I thought something was missing; non-technical skills. I wanted to be more involved, and joining student organizations has worked very well. ICSP (International Cultural Service Program) has allowed me to make new friends from other countries. IEEE Eta Kappa Nu allowed me to learn about organizing events in addition to attending a Student Leadership Conference on the East coast.

Which club will you join? 

Roof With a View

The fact that the city is filled with numerous food carts is one of my favorite things about Portland. Predictably, since starting at PSU, they’ve become slightly dangerous for my paycheck. The wealth of options for lunch and quick snacks around campus is really tempting. I find myself most often visiting the food cart pod on Fourth Avenue, hunting gyros or beef kebabs over saffron rice. It’s really amazing to be able to sample so many different cultures and try things that I ordinarily wouldn’t. Persian food was always in my rotation when I was younger but I hadn’t really found a good spot again when I moved away from my hometown. Luckily, there’s many Persian food carts around Portland — and they’re all mouthwatering. I was worried about having the same quality of Mexican food coming from California, but you guessed it, there’s multiple incredibly delicious food carts for that. Satisfying my desire to eat sushi as often and as on the go as possible? There’s a sushi burrito food cart for that! 

I still haven’t tried everything in the pod and around campus but it’s definitely on my to-do list by the end of the year. After an hour-long process to finally decide which cart to sample, the only decision left to make is where to enjoy my bounty. I am a proud and careful lunch-spot hunter. I like being somewhere semi-quiet and with a spectacular view. I haven’t been disappointed at all by PSU’s campus, and the downtown buildings have conjured a new option — a rooftop lunch. The best view I’ve found has to be on the fifth floor of the Academic Student Recreation Center. It’s nothing short of breathtaking to be able to see the changing fall colors and almost all of campus. I highly recommend checking it out if you haven’t before! It may be getting pretty cold, but I’m excited to see the changing colors of all the trees as the year goes by.

Sick of Being Sick

IMG_0830 By: Anna Sobczyk

Each term, I dread the day I’m going to catch whatever cold has been going around. College campus and the city are such germy environments that it feels inevitable. Classrooms, dorms, the gym, and public transit all compete to be the place you pick up a bug. I came to expect that I’d get sick around once per term and fall behind in classes. However, as time went on I didn’t want that to be my normal. 

I started looking into ways to boost my immune system naturally. Barely any research on herbal supplements exists and what does is all anecdotal. I’d dabbled with herbal supplements in the past with no success, so I wondered how people used them successfully.

After digging through the depths of the internet and talking to friends and extended friends I think I’ve finally cracked the code on how to prevent catching a cold. I used to take immune support supplements like elderberry syrup, oregano oil, and garlic just once when I started feeling sick. I learned I actually needed to take the herbal remedies every few hours for them to be effective—kind of like how you would an antibiotic. 

At the earliest onset of symptoms, I start taking elderberry syrup and oregano oil capsules 4-5 times a day. I eat cloves of garlic at night because I don’t want to walk around all day smelling like it. Unsavory as it is to most people, garlic is by far the cheapest and most effective method I’ve found. I believe in it so much that my friends will tell you I’m paid by the garlic commission. 

From one student to another, I know we all hate to get sick. No one has time for that. By no means am I a medical professional, and as a skeptic myself, I don’t like to base conclusions off of anecdotal evidence. But so far, I’ve only been sick once in 2019 (I write as I furiously knock on wood), and I felt compelled to share my method.

Getting Active

I used to play a lot of sports, but stopped playing in high school for various reasons before an injury put all sports on hold. I’ve played soccer, tennis, lacrosse, and volleyball, and really enjoyed all of them. I knew I wanted to get more active again, and hoped to find something that worked with my schedule and body. But I’m not the biggest fan of the gym so it was difficult for me to find consistent motivation to workout when I’m already on campus from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day — at least — and then tired and laden with homework by the time I get home.

       During a brief PSU stint in 2016, I played intramural volleyball, and was really grateful for the experience to play on a team at a higher-performing level. With that experience in mind, I checked out Night at the Rec at the beginning of the term and signed up for a bunch of different clubs that looked interesting. One of the only ones that worked with my schedule — and happened to seem the most open to clueless players — was women’s ultimate frisbee. I actually felt more insecure about continuing a sport I knew how to play because I hadn’t played in a long time, so something new it was! 

I was really nervous about it, but made myself go to the first practice, and ended up falling in love with it! There were a lot of new people and we have all caught on pretty quickly. Everyone is very kind and encouraging of one another, and it’s thrilling thinking about playing in tournaments representing PSU. Playing ultimate has kept me really active and has served as that motivation I was looking for. I find myself trying to be in shape to be a better player on the field. There’s also a profound sense of community at practices — especially when we’re doing ab workouts and all suffering together.

I’d encourage everyone to try out a club or sport if you’re thinking about it. You’re especially welcome at women’s ultimate!

Transfer Students Need to Stick Together

Thinking about transferring from Portland Community College to Portland State University, I had always felt exuberant and confident. Unfortunately, in the spring term of last year, my nerves about transferring had begun to swamp my excitement. I felt inferior to the other juniors who had spent their first two years at PSU, learning where the best study spots were and which elevators wouldn’t take an eon to reach the fourth floor in Cramer Hall. 

I knew that I would learn it all in time, but the feeling that I was playing catch-up still bothered me — especially as someone who considers feeling ahead of the game to be part of their personality. 

PSU was a much bigger campus than I was used to, with more resources, buildings and people. I was thrilled to begin taking upper division classes and starting to study some really fascinating stuff in preparation for my dream career, but it simultaneously seemed to loom over me like a mountain I wouldn’t be able to climb. I was incredibly nervous, but I made myself go to one of the Viking Days events — the transfer student happy hour. It turned out to be wildly fun, I got to demonstrate my prowess at trivia, and I got the sense that a lot of other people there also were nervous about starting school. It was nice to feel that I wasn’t alone, something which I knew rationally but still needed to see demonstrated to feel better.

 I’m learning the ins and outs of PSU pretty fast. Transfer students blend in pretty well with the rest of the crowd, but there are still resources to distinguish us and our different experiences. I haven’t checked out the new Transfer Student Resource Center in Fariborz Maseeh Hall, but I am curious about stopping by. I think in the future more events specifically aimed at transfer students would be a great idea — because we’re all out there, but finding and holding on to one another is really helpful! 

Taking Notes Doesn’t Have to Be Boring

Untitled design-3 by Claire Golden

Taking notes is one of the best ways to retain information. We’ve all heard it before…writing things down helps them stick in your mind. That doesn’t change the fact that taking notes can get a little boring. But I’m a huge nerd who loves taking notes, and there are a few ways you can spice up your everyday notes to make it fun. Here’s a picture of my notes from class last year. Keep in mind that not everybody is as obsessive as I am, so your mileage may vary. Do whatever works for you!

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First, get a notebook that you love. You don’t have to get any particular kind. Just find one that makes you smile and inspires you to fill it up. My notebook for this term was $4 from Muji, a store by Pioneer Square just a few blocks from campus that’s a great source for inexpensive school supplies. If you’re tired of lined paper, try graph paper or dot grid to change things up.

To go with your notebook, of course you need a writing utensil. Whether that’s a mechanical pencil or quill pen, just make sure it’s easy to write with. My latest obsession is fountain pens. Some students enjoy multicolored highlighters to color-code their notes. And many students prefer taking notes electronically, whether on their computer or tablet. The idea is simply to try changing things up if you’re bored with your notes.

When it comes time to actually take notes, be creative! You don’t have to write in a linear fashion. Try putting important facts in boxes or other shapes. It’s easy to experiment with different headings and bullet points to keep the process interesting. A few doodles never hurt, either. With a few little changes, taking notes can be both an educational and a creative process…and a lot more fun!

Writing an Essay Without Tears

Untitled design-3 by Claire Golden

We’ve all been there: the deadline for that five-page essay is looming, and you don’t know where to start. I’ve written a lot of essays in my three years as a writing student, and this is the process I use to reduce stress.

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  • Leave yourself plenty of time. Although a Red Bull-fueled typing frenzy at 3 a.m. is certainly an effective motivational tactic, it usually results in mistakes and a subpar essay.
  • Find your thesis. This is simply the main idea of your paper – the more specific, the better.

  • Make a haphazard outline. An easy method is to write the general topic of each paragraph, followed by a few bullet points of things you want to include.
  • Find your quotes. When you’re on a roll with a paragraph, the last thing you want to do is stop to scour the text for quotes. The nice thing about finding quotes before you start is that you can tailor the paper around them rather than trying to fit them in at the end.

  • Write! There’s no need to write in a linear order if you don’t want to. Just use your outline at the end to make sure everything’s in the right spot.
  • Read it out loud. This helps to catch grammar and syntax problems you might otherwise miss. Don’t forget to run it through SpellCheck, too. 

By the way, the Writing Center is a fantastic resource to visit anytime during this process. Take a deep breath. You’ve got this essay under control.