Why I ‘Sailed through the Stars’

Kellie Doherty  By Kellie Doherty

Graduate school is busy and stressful. But don’t get me wrong, I love my book publishing program. I’ll be sad to leave next month, but sometimes I just have to do something else. PSU has no shortage of cool events for students, and last Saturday was no exception.

I decided to go to the Pacific Islander’s Club 14th Annual Lu’au called “Sailing through the Stars.” It was held at the Stott Center a block from my apartment and the entrance was free for students, so I thought, “What the heck, a lu’au sounds fun.” I’m so happy I went.

First off, the place was packed—students, kids, elderly folk—it seemed like every age range wanted to participate. The dinner had traditional food, including Kalua pork, a lovely guava juice, and even wide range of desserts. (I chose poi for my dessert, a purple paste made of taro root but tasted a little like pineapple.)

The entertainment was quite fun. They had a show with traditional music and dances all from different islands, like Hawaii, New Zealand, and Fiji, among others. (Plus there were fire dancers, and they’re just plain hot. Pun intended.)

Overall it was a great night. It made me forget my stresses for a while, and we all know that forgetting your stress, even for a moment, is important. If you’re still here next year, make sure to add this event to your ToDo. It’s one you won’t want to miss.

Tabling Photo

Tabling: It’s Awkward for Everyone

Kellie Doherty

By Kellie Doherty

We all know that tabling is an awkward college life experience. People standing behind a highly decorated table, silently willing students over by expression alone. Passersby quickening their pace or looking the opposite direction just so they don’t have to deal with it. Let’s face it, it’s awkward for everyone involved. And, having recently finished a tabling session myself, I’d like to change that.

Here are some tips to deal with tabling.

For The Ones Doing the Tabling

  • Have candy (seriously, everyone loves candy)
  • Make interesting signs
  • Have easy-to-pick-up trinkets (buttons, stickers, bookmarks, pens)
  • Have a conversation instead of just a script
  • Be Warned: People will use your table as an actual table, be cool with it.

For The Ones Passing By

  • Smile if you make eye contact with a tabling person (it’s just nice)
  • If the subject matter looks interesting, stop by and chat
  • Take a bookmark, pen, or whatever trinket they have (it’ll make their day)
  • Take only one piece of candy, two at most
  • Be Warned: If you stop by a table you’re not actually interested in, it’ll probably be boring. (There I said it!) If it’s not interesting to you or to someone you know who you could pass the information along to, move along.

Following these simple tabling tricks will make it less awkward for everybody. And, seriously, everyone loves candy. Remember that, and it’ll be a success for us all.


Why We Play


By: Sam Bakkila

Campus Rec has been asking all of its visitors why they play.

I’ve been thinking about this question a lot myself. I play for many different reasons, but I think my deepest answer is that playing allows me to be a total beginner. Rarely as an adult do you have an invitation to fail spectacularly at something that you’ve never tried before. Giving yourself time to play and cultivating a spirit of playfulness helps remind you to take risks, to not fear failure, and to be ready to pick yourself back up when you do inevitably fall.

The next new way to play that I want to try out is Intramural Battleship, which will be offered for the first time ever at Campus Rec in early December. In this fun enactment of the classic board game, teams paddle around in canoes and use buckets to splash other teams until their boats take on water and sink.

Playing a new game or sport breaks a lot of bad habits that hold people back and create unnecessary stress. You can’t be shy, you must learn to work as a team, and you absolutely have to be able to laugh at yourself!

This is our featured member Jonathan, his story, and his reason to play:

Want to share the reason why you play with Campus Rec? We’ll be making more videos and sharing member stories all year. Submit your story here!


A guide to Portland’s Best Halloween Haunts

Chelsea 2

By: Chelsea Ware

Cooler weather, crisp leaves, and pumpkin spice lattes are a few of the reasons that fall is great. But in my humble opinion, Halloween is what makes fall the finest season of the year. I mean really… who can say no to dressing up in an awesome costume and gorging oneself on candy? In honor of the greatest holiday ever and all things horror related, I have compiled a list of the best and scariest things to do in Portland this month.

  1. Visit a Haunted House

Portland boasts several haunted houses that are worth seeing. Set inside the Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Fright Town offers 3 haunted attractions based off of witches, the novelist H.P Lovecraft, and a demonic cult.

13th Door is one of Portland’s oldest haunted houses and presents dark dank hallways for you and your friends to escape in addition to decomposing zombies and other vile creatures.

2. See a Free Scary Movie

Through the month of October the PSU student run movie theater, 5th Avenue Cinema, plays vintage scary movies on Saturdays and Sundays. And it’s free with your student ID! Some of my best college memories are at this theater. It’s a great atmosphere where the whole crowd cracks jokes together during the movie and revels in the campiness and gore of 80’s and 90’s horror cinema. For show times visit

3. Take a Stroll Through Haloweentown

Each October, the town of St. Helens, which was the filming site of the movie Halloweentown, hosts “The Spirit of Halloweentown.” It is a, family-friendly event in which the old town district is decorated with a plethora of jack-o-lanterns, scarecrows and other spooky decorations. Additionally, events such as tarot reading and pumpkin carving are held.—schedule-of-events/article_4e14e578-51b6-11e5-9a62-a39167c7bbce.html


Putting the Pub Back in Publishing

Kellie Doherty

By Kellie Doherty

Every year the second-year graduate students of the book publishing program join the new students (we call them “little fish”) at a local bar. Last year it was at Cheerful Tortoise and this year, Rogue. Not all the little fish go, of course, but the ones who do get to meet the second years and mingle with their incoming class. It’s a fun process, and one I was glad to be a part of two years in a row. I have to say, though, the way I felt about this informal meeting couldn’t be more different.

Last year, I was part of the incoming class. I was the little fish. It was seriously overwhelming, meeting all these new people and hearing about the jobs the second years had, but it felt good to be part of a group, too. Knowing I could learn from these awesome people diminished some of the fear of starting the program.

I’m a second year now. I know things! I’ve been through the gauntlet, survived, and had a blast! So when I walked into the bar and saw all the cheerful (yet apprehensive) faces of the little fish, I felt pretty good about easing their worries. At the very least, I made them feel welcomed, feel part of a group like the second years in my term did for me. And hopefully, when it’s these little fishes’ turn, they’ll do the same, too.

Do any of your programs have an informal meeting like this?


Looking back on a year of fitness

selfieBy: Sam Bakkila

In the corner of my room, right in front of my over-crammed bookcase, I keep my black Nike tennis shoes. These shoes have followed me a long way: they’ve cushioned me on ten mile runs, supported me when I put 300 pounds on my shoulders in the gym, and even splashed into the Willamette with me during crew practice on one of the most scorching days of this unusually hot summer.

When I started as a graduate student at Portland State last fall, I knew that I would need to be proactive about finding time for recreation and fitness. I’m getting my master’s degree in English literature, and I am also teaching writing courses to undergraduates. Trying to be a student and an instructor at the same time can be demanding and I knew that there would be no time for play in my schedule unless I made it a priority.

When I was in college, I didn’t have the healthiest habits. I rarely got seven hours of sleep, and though I liked to exercise, I didn’t make time for it regularly enough to reap its benefits. I was always tired and stressed-out and relying on coffee to give me the energy to power through my day.

I decided that graduate school would be different. My first step was that I signed up to have a personal trainer at Campus Rec. I had never felt very comfortable lifting weights—at other gyms, it always seemed like everyone else there had been lifting for years and they were silently judging my rookie mistakes. Having access to very affordable personal training led by other PSU students in such a welcoming environment was a great opportunity for me.

Before I started, I had lower back pain from sitting with bad posture at my computer, and I didn’t have enough flexibility to even perform some of the most basic lifts. Now, I lace up my Nike’s practically everyday, and as I perform my favorite lifts I feel my new-found strength radiating from my muscles throughout my whole body.

My shoes are now worn and ready to be replaced, and I find myself feeling surprisingly sentimental about letting them go. In buying these shoes, which were a little bit of a splurge on my student budget, I decided that I deserved good support in pursuing my fitness endeavors. In using these shoes, I remembered how much I like to challenge myself to get a little bit stronger everyday. Today, these shoes and their wear and tear represent goals made and goals achieved.


What a Wonderful Year

meBy: Sharon Nellist

This upcoming year at Portland State is the one I have been waiting for.

Not only is it my last undergraduate year (hoping to stay for graduate studies!), but I am comfortably involved in various ways to ensure that quintessential college experience that I have been pining for all of my young adult life – and I am elated!

I WRITE – for the PSU Chronicles, and I love it. This is my voice and I intend to use it. I hope to flourish my opinion on controversial issues not only on campus but within my community. This is the only option for change.

I PLAY – or rather dabble in various Rec clubs from swing dancing, to Dragon Boat racing, and rowing. I am taking advantage of all that our unique urban campus has to offer like the week-long community celebration Portland State of Mind, FREE movies at the student-run 5th Avenue Cinema, and the privilege of listening to generous amounts of brilliant minds at PSU hosted events.

I SERVE – as a Student Leader for Service through the Student Community Engagement Center. Stepping a bit out my box and yearning for growth as a leader, I am a liaison between PSU and Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives’ Healthy Food Access Program. I also am tending community gardens at low-income properties, working with residents and hosting workshops on garden eating, helping organize community service projects and getting PSU students involved! It cannot get any more GREEN or PORTLAND than this.

My only advice to all of the new students – live these years to the fullest, PSU is simply handing it to you.