Eat like a caveman, become lean like caveman?

paleo dietBy Mario Quintana

The definition of a diet, according to Merriam-Webster, means food and drink regularly provided or consumed, habitual nourishment, or the kind and amount of food prescribed for a person or animal for a special reason. And for many, that special reason is to lose weight for a specific occasion or for their health. Some will try numerous diets and various exercise regimens to accomplish said goal. A few months ago, I jumped on the bandwagon and started the paleo diet in order to lean out.

Simply described, the paleo diet uses the logic that our ancestors only had access to meat, eggs, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and fats from some of these these sources. Therefore, it excludes agricultural productions such as grains, dairy, legumes, refined salt, refined sugar, potatoes, and processed oils from one’s diet. At first glance, the paleo diet makes sense and even more so here in Portland. One month into the diet, I noticed a change in weight. However, I soon began to continuously feel lethargic, exhausted, and weak.

The paleo diet reasons that by consuming little to no carbohydrates, the body will naturally use up all the stored fat one has for energy. You lose weight and become lean like our ancestors were. However, there is no substantial evidence to support that our ancestors followed this diet. Up to 60% of the paleo diet heavily focuses on eating meat and fats. That percentage is simply too high for the average sedentary person, even for those who exercise, and even for world-class athletes. As for the weight that I lost, and much to my dismay, most of it turned out to be mostly muscle.

Eating healthy and exercising daily may be hard to start for many, but perhaps what’s even worse is doing both based on fads or what’s popular. In other words, one needs to research scientifically peer reviewed information on nutrition and kinesiology to understand the human body to successfully change it and maintain it. For those interested, I suggest reading Dr. T. Colin Campbell ‘s research.

Sweat to be sexy? I don’t think so

Sweat to be sexy? I don't think so

By Amanda Katz

“I think you look good already! You don’t even need to work out.”

This was the text message I received after telling my friend I was going to go the gym and I’d text him back later.

Let’s get some things straight.

I don’t work out to impress other people. I work out to be healthy and feel good about myself. The opinion of a male makes no difference in my pursuit of a healthier lifestyle.

Too often girls are told to diet and work out to be “sexy” or “attractive.” What happened to working out and eating properly for health reasons? Why does my choice to be active have to be to gain a reaction from a male? Is that all I’m meant to do, strive to be attractive to gain suitors?

I don’t understand why so many guys feel entitled to think that I would work out to gain their attention. I don’t need the approval of any guy on my body, because at the end of the day the only opinion of my body that matters to me is my own.