The Self-Care Backlash

IMG_0830 By: Anna Sobczyk

Between classes, homework, jobs, and more, student life is busy. Not only is finding time for yourself (self-care) difficult, but it isn’t prioritized. Even though self-care is all over the media these days, actually implementing it can be received with scorn. I encountered this when I began to shift my personal schedule around to make time for myself more of a priority.

Exercise is my version of self-care. Swimming and running are my main stress relievers and my form of meditation. I especially love training for long-distance races, because it’s time and effort I put in just for my personal achievement. When I signed up for a half marathon in May, one of my extracurricular groups knew and saw it as a conflict of commitment. They tried to guilt me out of it even though I had carefully planned my schedule to have time for everything. They completely overlooked and undermined how important is was to me. 

I didn’t anticipate that training for this race—something done for myself—would be met with such backlash, especially from people it really didn’t affect. Oftentimes I think it’s easy to forget that people are multifaceted with several interests, and that we’re all trying to find the mix of interests that make us the happiest.

#WalkToTheBeat

blog1 (1) By: Xylia Lydgate

It feels good to be a part of a cause that is greater than yourself. On Saturday, May 20, I joined with hundreds of Portlanders as we walked together to raise awareness for heart disease and stroke. Although I do not personally have any close relatives who have battled with heart related illness, it was empowering to walk for such a large cause with millions of supporters nationwide. Participants wore signs honoring those who have passed as they marched around the Portland International Raceway.

At the beginning of the race, our team gathered before the start line where we could explore the vendors, win free swag, make signs, and more. As soon as 9 a.m. rolled around, the first wave of walkers began the course; our team followed shortly afterwards. Volunteers near every mile marker cheered us on. Even a rap DJ boosted our energy as we approached the finish line.

Overall, I believe the positive energy and spirit of the cause was transferred to the hearts of the walkers and their loved ones. This walk reminded me that we are all in this together. We are only born with one heart. As living and breathing human beings, any one of us could be susceptible to heart disease or sudden stroke. Events like these speak to the value of life.

Completing this walk has allowed me to take a step back and remember that there are other vital events happening around us aside from school and work. Especially as a busy student, it is easy to lose sight of our surroundings and other crucial life events. If you haven’t already, I would highly recommend searching for a local walk for charity near your city.

http://www.active.com/charitable

http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/workout/running/tips/get-fit-for-a-cause/

https://www.verywell.com/walk-finder-events-by-state-3435354

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Want to Live Longer?

blog1 (1) By: Xylia Lydgate

With a busy lifestyle, it’s easy to fall prey to a sedentary lifestyle. While there are countless factors that contribute to the increased risk of health-related issues, one factor that is often overlooked is cardiorespiratory fitness. This is something I notice in myself when I go weeks or even months with minimal physical activity.

I’ve observed that when I try to get back into an exercise regime after a long absence, I will have a more difficult time catching my breath, my muscles will feel more fatigued, I will feel less mentally motivated—and I’m only 21 years old! Although I’d like to blame this on my full school and work schedule, I know it is inexcusable to not exercise.

One of my favorite videos on the benefits of exercise is called “23 ½ hours: What is the best thing we can do for our health?” by Dr. Mike Evans. He presents a unique case backed with scientific research of how just 30 minutes of physical activity a day can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure and increase longevity. In fact, he shares several studies indicating “low fitness” to be the strongest predictor of death.

While this all sounds like common sense, we may find it awkward to fit in as little as 30 minutes of activity each day. Although level of intensity and length of time contribute to additional benefits, your 30 minutes of activity doesn’t need to be anything strenuous to reap significant health benefits. Exercise can also be done in three sessions of 10 minutes for equal benefit. At Campus Rec, we offer over twenty different 30-minute workout ideas including weights, agility, TRX, cardio, rock climbing and swimming. These can be accessed online or in-person throughout each floor of the gym.

In a society where there is a strong presence of advertisements for over-the-counter medications and where literature on health is often funded and influenced by large drug companies, it is easy to see why many Americans turn to medicine as a quick remedy for all their health issues. However, research shows that exercise is one of the best medicines. As Dr. Evans put it, do your best to limit your sitting and sleeping to just 23 ½ hours a day.

Today is the day to commit to an active lifestyle.

A COLLEGE STUDENT’S PLAYGROUND


blog1 (1)

By: Xylia Lydgate

I have been coming to Campus Rec for a little over two years now but only recently watched (and rewatched) this video— gives me goosebumps every time! What strikes me most about it is how it really accentuates the inclusivity at Campus Rec. It is more than just a building or a gym; it’s a community that welcomes all students and community members with open arms.

As a Campus Rec employee, I find myself here all the time; partly because I work here but also because it’s a place where I can relax and unwind after a long day. When I’m done with school and work, I stay and hit the Fitness Center. I’ve never been much of the athletic or “sporty” type— and for the record, I’m probably the most uncoordinated person when it comes to hitting, throwing or dodging balls— but I simply enjoy working out on my own. Moving from the cardio floor to the weight room, I become easily lost in the tempo of my workout routine, the catchy tunes of my playlist, the rhythm of counting my reps, and the constant beating of basketballs hitting wooden courts fade into the soundscape.

There’s a place for everyone here, even if you’re not a “gym junkie.” Hit the courts and play a youthful game of H-O-R-S-E, challenge your friends to a match of table tennis or grab a couple swim noodles and hose down a friend in the pool (yes, they do serve as multi-functional water guns). Of course ya can’t forget about our TV lounge and those comfy couches in the locker rooms! So the next time you’re waiting between classes or need a place to “hang out,” drop by the Rec and make yourself at home.

How do you like to play?

Sweat to be sexy? I don’t think so

Sweat to be sexy? I don't think so

By Amanda Katz

“I think you look good already! You don’t even need to work out.”

This was the text message I received after telling my friend I was going to go the gym and I’d text him back later.

Let’s get some things straight.

I don’t work out to impress other people. I work out to be healthy and feel good about myself. The opinion of a male makes no difference in my pursuit of a healthier lifestyle.

Too often girls are told to diet and work out to be “sexy” or “attractive.” What happened to working out and eating properly for health reasons? Why does my choice to be active have to be to gain a reaction from a male? Is that all I’m meant to do, strive to be attractive to gain suitors?

I don’t understand why so many guys feel entitled to think that I would work out to gain their attention. I don’t need the approval of any guy on my body, because at the end of the day the only opinion of my body that matters to me is my own.