Crafting in Quarantine: “Quaranzines”

By Erika Nelson

Whether in mandatory or self-imposed isolation, people are turning to hobbies like arts and crafts to keep themselves occupied.  One fun project having a moment on social media is zine-making: The hashtag #quaranzine has over 5,000 hits on Instagram.

Merriam-Webster defines a zine as “a noncommercial often homemade or online publication usually devoted to specialized and often unconventional subject matter.” There is no right or wrong way to make a zine — it can be handmade or digital; thrown together or carefully planned. Zines can be anything you want — a mini-book of self-published poetry, a political manifesto, your own comic book…the possibilities are only limited by your imagination and materials available. 

I made two different zines using this paper-folding tutorial. One is called This is Your Life Now, and I used acrylic paint and magazine clippings to create a tongue-in-cheek manual for embracing the new normal. 

I included a spread featuring things I do in quarantine, such as sleep, play games… 

…and fantasize about being productive. 

My second zine was a parody of Time magazine: The cover features an image of more innocent times — a crowded beach — and the headline, “There will be no summer (and probably no autumn).” 

Of  course, I had to include fake advertisements. 

I encourage everyone to try making their own quaranzines! Arts and crafts do more than just fill free hours — they can be therapeutic during scary and uncertain times, and sharing your art on social media can help foster community in a time of isolation. So grab some art supplies, fire up the publishing software, or simply use a paper and pen — let’s do some quarantine crafting!

Living in University Pointe

It is that time of year, again. A new school year, new classes, and for me, a new place to live.

University Pointe, the new on-campus 16-floor apartment building, is finally open for lease to all students this fall. The apartments definitely surpassed my expectations of a typical apartment. My roommates and I chose the private four-bedroom and two-bathroom option. It is fully furnished, with lots of personal and community amenities. It is definitely an upgrade from my first-year shared room when I lived in the Broadway dormitory. With my own room and no RA, I enjoy my own independence and privacy. However, there are Community assistants and on-site staff to help whenever it is needed.

There is a controversy with the cost of the apartments. For my four-bedroom room, it is $599 per person. Compared to apartments in the surrounding Portland area, the cost averages around $300-600 per person (rent.com). Before I decided to live in the apartments, I considered these off-campus alternatives in Clackamas, Beaverton, and other areas in Portland. Ultimately, I chose University Pointe because it was conveniently on-campus, therefore, saving a few hundred bucks from not purchasing a parking permit or transit pass. In addition, the utilities are all included in the rent.

If you are looking for a place to live on or off campus, check out these sites:

  • pdx.edu/housing/buildings
  • portland.craigslist.org/apa
  • rent.com
  • apartments.com
  • univpointe.com