Tips for Trouble-Free Transit Travel

Untitled design-3 By Claire Golden

One of the main reasons I chose PSU is because I could live at home and commute to college. I didn’t want to live away from my family for that long, and the dorms were too expensive, so commuting was the perfect solution. After three and a half years of taking the bus, I’m far from a master of public transportation, but I’m much more comfortable with it than I was when I started. And I have some tips to share with anybody in the same shoes.

The best tool you can have as a commuter is a good bag. My backpack has held up through my entire college career, and I suspect it will keep going for many more years. As cool as messenger bags look, they’re terrible on your back. For me, nothing can take the place of a reliable backpack. Mine has side pockets to store my water bottle.

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TriMet is a great way of getting around Portland. They recently started a low-income fare program. If you’re a broke college student like me, you just might be eligible. You get to ride the bus, Max, and streetcar for half the price, which has been a lifesaver for me. (Don’t forget you can ride the streetcar for free with your PSU student ID!) The TriMet transit tracking app is useful for knowing when your bus will show up, which means you can time your commute so you don’t have to wait outside for so long.

If you’re going to be walking around after dark, it’s important to have a light – you can clip it to your backpack for easy access. You also may want to consider self-defense, whether that’s taking a class or getting some pepper spray. For safety reasons, I always make sure somebody knows where I am and when I plan to be home. I encourage you to make a safety plan, too. 

Another thing I like having in my backpack is my Kindle, which I use to read ebooks while I commute. It’s amazing how much reading you can get done that way. Or you can listen to audiobooks, podcasts, or your favorite music. It makes the commute go by much faster. Now I look forward to my bus rides…they’re a fun part of my day.

Changing the Way you Study

By: Ragan Love

In my recital class, I get to hear many speakers talk about different aspects of music that will help in our practice routine and professional careers. One topic that has really stuck with me was about ‘mindful practicing’. This is when you think and plan out what your goals are, instead of going to a practice room and setting a timer for two hours. 

What the professor said next surprised me: if you don’t feel like practicing at all, go into a practice room and set a timer for five or ten minutes. In that time, play something very simple. If the timer goes off and you are still unmotivated, you should put away the instrument and try again later. If you push yourself farther than your body wants, it will stop being productive and will actually hurt your progress for the next few days.

There were two big takeaways that I saw in this lesson. I have not only applied them to my music school work but also my academic work. Mindful practicing taught me how to be productive on my non-productive days. 

Another key aspect that I took away from this lesson is how to rethink your practice routine. Before this, every music teacher told me that I need to practice for 60 minutes a day but didn’t tell me how to efficiently practice my material. When you put a timer on, you think about what you can do to fill that time instead of what you need to work on. This is why you should go into your practice routine with few set goals, like working on a certain section or one specific piece. Sometimes with your specific goals you won’t hit that standard two hours a day but it’s ok because you benefited more by focusing on goals rather than time.

I think that it is important to acknowledge that there comes a time when we all run out of motivation and energy to push through some assignments, and if you try to push through an assignment, you burn out. So when you have a day where you can’t focus, try to study for ten minutes then when the timer goes off and you aren’t motivated, its best to step away in order to be more productive later on. 

Translating mindful practicing to mindful studying is a bit more abstract. Before applying mindful studying, I would get a writing assignment and plan on getting in completely done at one time. But when you spend hours on a paper, your brain can get fried. You should plan on getting certain sections done over a couple of days. Yes, this does mean that you need to stay on top of your work, but it allows you to replenish your thoughts and look over with a productive brain. 

Mindful practicing has not only aided my musician skills and practice time, but has also helped me when it comes to my academic life.

Study anytime, 24/7 on Campus

By Wiwin Hartini

When school starts, everyone gets busy working on assignments. It’s week 5 already and we’re getting closer to midterms. I’m nervous just to think about that because I know assignments are due soon and exams are coming up. Stress level is increasing while time is still constant. This is when I try to break down every task into a smaller task and focus on finishing it rather than to sit down for hours trying to finish one assignment all at once. 

A study place becomes critical because there is always that “one place” where I can be more productive without a lot of distractions. It’s tricky to find a comfortable place to study because I do need that “studying atmosphere”. And each individual definitely has different preferences.

What’s nice about PSU is that I can study pretty much in almost all buildings 24/7 with the card access on our IDs. I found this very helpful because I like to stay late and I enjoy doing homework when people are sleeping. For example, I can actually go to the Power Lab in the engineering building and use it anytime, 24/7. I’ve seen other students utilize the facility around 3-4 AM which impresses me because as a student, I like to be surrounded by other motivated students.

I think it’s a luxury and asset for students to have access to campus facilities 24/7. The library opens until 12 AM on weekdays too. I’ve used the study rooms in the library and KMC to prep for presentations. I’d say that it’s fun to explore other buildings to find study spots because it’s easy to just spend the whole quarter in one or two buildings where our classes are thus missing out on other things provided by PSU.

Go Thorns!

It’s February, which means my fingers twitch toward the bookmark in my web browser, wanting to carry out the urge to check it one more time, despite knowing  I’ll get an email anyway. I have to smile at myself — years ago, if I knew I’d be frothing at the mouth to get my hands on good seats for a soccer match, I would have denied it. 

I played sports as a kid, but organized events were another thing entirely. I also hated growing up in my California hometown, so I never felt any real pride for local sports teams. My mom is an avid soccer fan, but I didn’t often watch with her, instead preferring to preserve my own life force. Sometimes she would get so excited I feared she would squeeze all the air out of my lungs (Love you, Mom). 

However, since coming to Portland, I knew I should eventually take part in a Portland rite of passage — seeing a soccer match at Providence Park. Needless to say, I was hooked. I’ve now been to both Timbers and Thorns games, but I prefer the Thorns. It’s a really wholesome atmosphere — you can’t look anywhere in the arena without seeing a giant pride flag being waved vigorously, and the energy of the cheering crowd is infectious. Our team is good, too, and a lot of fun to watch. I feel represented and welcomed in the crowd, where the atmosphere is never murderous even in the face of a loss. I feel represented in the team, too. 

I’d recommend going to a match this spring when the Thorns start playing again. Maybe you’ll too join the ranks of fans who give in for an overpriced beverage and a scarf. It’s worth it for the experience, I promise.

I imagine much of my joy comes from feeling like I’m part of something, feeling pride in my home team and getting to watch these amazing, diverse women excel. I’m sure it would be dangerous for my mom and I to both go to a soccer match, we’d probably be cutting off each other’s circulation out of excitement, but we’ll probably do it anyway. 

Listening is an Important Skill to Practice

DSC04253 by Jennifer V.

An often overlooked skill that I wish I had is the skill of listening. I must admit, I am a terrible listener and I have been for the longest time. My attention span is equivalent to a child’s (not really, but kind of) and I have trouble displaying interest when someone is talking to me. 

I recently came across a quote that said, “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” This is something I never thought about and it’s very true. We listen to say something back, we listen to give advice. However, sometimes people don’t want advice, they just want someone to listen and to sympathize. 

We should listen with the intent of curiosity, because genuine conversation can only happen if we truly want to learn something new. Something that a lot of us tend to do, especially when a friend is venting about their problems, is turning the conversation and making it about ourselves. We usually do this with good intent, hoping that it shows them we understand what they’re going through because we can relate to the situation. Feedback and responses are always good and shows that you’re listening however, we should keep our own talking to a minimal and especially not shift the focus of the conversation to ourselves. 

From now on, I will be more cautious in my everyday conversations, whether I am having a heart to heart conversation with my best friend or a small talk with the cashier at the grocery store; I will listen.

The Zoo

by Julien-Pierre Campbell


“Theodore, stop! Bad dog.
Stop! Oh, my goodness — ahh! Babe, can you just grab the cat? No, the other cat. No, the other cat!”

 

I was ready to tear my hair out. See, I had just moved in with my fiance, and we were experiencing some growing pains, particularly in the pet department. The house was a zoo. I took a step, yowling cat in my arms, and tripped over the pit bull. He was whining, the cat was hissing at him, and from the living room, another cat was caterwauling for dinner. 

 

“Oh my goodness!” I released the cat I was holding. She hissed and spat, then turned tail for the closet. The dog continued to whine. Finally, somehow, we fed all the pets dinner. The hysteria settled down. I locked eyes with the person I was spending the rest of my life with. A thought crossed my mind: You’re also spending the rest of your life with all these animals!

 

I live in a two-bedroom apartment. It’s a really lovely place. My roommates, a married couple, are the sweetest ladies in the world. Our location is great! And of course I live with the love of my life! Always a positive. The only problem: in our small square footage, there are five cats and two dogs. Four of those cats are bonded pairs who hate the others. The fifth is lovingly referred to as “the bastard” for his propensity for biting. Two of the cats hate dogs. One of them — mine — had never met a dog before and doesn’t know what to think of them. Most of the pets cannot co-exist in the same room. All this to say: it’s been an adjustment period.

 

Part of being 20 is, I think, figuring out how to exist in the world with other people. What I hadn’t anticipated was learning to exist with their pets. Dinnertime at my house is never dull. Homework may feature a 55-pound pit bull sitting on your lap. Taking a shower generally includes a blind chihuahua licking your toes. There is much breaking-up of catfights and rescuing the dog when the cats gang up on him.

 

For all the chaos, though, it’s wonderful. This is what it means to be young. A little mess, a little negotiating, and some craziness are all part of life. Our pets are so, so loved. Many of them have come from abusive homes or were strays. Now they live in a house with four parents who adore them and totally spoil them. 

 

I have never lived with this many animals, and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t love it. Of course it’s hard and chaotic, but it’s fun. We pride ourselves on how well taken care of our little monsters are! And if they’re happy, I’m happy. 

Trouble Choosing a Major?

By Maya Young

We’ve all been there. Beginning an academic journey at a university or college and being overwhelmed by the range of major pathways and course offerings. How do I choose? What am I good at? What do I want to do after college? These are but a few of the questions that I wondered myself when I started school at PSU. Although the process can be very intimidating, I have a few tips that will help you make the decision easier.

See an advisor. Talk to other students. Speak with professors.

There are numerous resources available to you on-campus that can help you make the most of your education. These advisors know how you are feeling and know how to help.

Use your first year at school to explore different classes.

This can be easily achieved by choosing your University Studies courses wisely. Are you interested in researching popular culture? Tackling environmental sustainability? Understanding the importance of social change? There is a wide selection of themes to choose from that can guide you in finding a new interest. 

Establish your goals.

Think broadly about why you are enrolled in college in the first place. What do you want out of this experience? How can your education help you out later in life? If you are unsure of what you want to do specifically, consider your values and interests. Do you want to make a difference in the world? Do you want to help others? Do you want to create something, start a new business, launch a new product? Answering these questions may help you find what you’re looking for.