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Young and Restless

blog1 (1) By: Xylia Lydgate

As I continue to push through my senior year, there are three things that can’t seem to escape my mind. First, graduating: walking down the stage and receiving my diploma. Second, my future career: where I’ll be applying post graduation and how I’ll get there. And third, traveling the world: having the ability to enjoy the cultures and cuisines and new sights of other countries before settling into a stable career.

My utmost desire is to travel. It is an energy that’s been burning inside of me since I took my first Spanish class in high school. Not only did I learn a new language, but it exposed me to a different way of life and a different way of thinking about the world.

Now that I have 44 weeks left of school, I feel that I’m in a now-or-never situation. I have one summer remaining before graduating; that means one step closer to transitioning into a career. I know most jobs don’t provide you with much paid time off or vacation days, especially for recent college grads. And I don’t want to be that adult who looks back and says, “Traveling is the one thing I wish I did.”

The clock it ticking, and I am proud to say that I have officially started planning for my first international trip projected for summer 2017. I plan to travel throughout Southeast Asia for two months, exploring Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

If you’re reading this right now, I encourage you to get outside of your comfort zone and see what else the world has to offer. In fact, PSU has a ton of resources to support you with international travel. In a rush like me? Campus Rec’s Outdoor Program is leading a week long, backpacking trip through Colombia this June!

Colombia Lost City Trekkinghttps://www.pdx.edu/recreation/international-trip

PSU Education Abroad Program: http://www.pdx.edu/ed-abroad/

Don’t allow yourself to become complacent to your day-to-day routine…travel!

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Portland Snowpocalypse 2017

By Emma Eberhart

As we all know this Winter Term is off to quite an interesting start; well “start” may not be the best term to use. This winter storm hit, and it hit hard. Below are some photos from, what I am calling, “The Portland Snowpocalypse of 2017.”

 

screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-4-11-58-pmTuesday night I had the bright idea of going to Ikea for some apartment necessities. The snow started as we headed home, and I’m fairly confident we spent more time driving back to downtown than we spent at the store.

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In between snowfalls Tuesday night, I went for a walk. It seemed as if every tree branch in downtown was covered with a blanket of snow. The entire city was eerily quiet, most definitely an unnerving calm.

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At one point on Wednesday a couple of pals and myself attempted to clear the path for our car with pots and pans, but were not successful with our endeavors.

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All in all – I was not impressed with the white flurry and do not recommend attempting to do anything other than cozy up indoors.

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How to Make Friends (When You Don’t Live on Campus)

img_4865  By: Andrew D. Jankowski

Coming back to school at age 27 was weird beyond the on-paper age difference. Even though I no longer live in what some of us, to varying degrees of affection, call “the PSU fishbowl,” I still enjoy meeting people, making connections, and growing friendships. It was easy when I lived in a dorm (ahem, residence hall). My best friend from high school was my roommate, and I made friends with my neighbors on my floor, then later other floors. (I’ll cry if and when Ondine Hall ever goes on to meet the Great Real Estate Development Firm in the Sky.)

But how do you make friends when your classmates live in other neighborhoods, towns, or even states? (I see you, Vancouver commuters!)

Talk (Effectively) with Your Classmates

Effective communication is vital to the success of any major. I’ve found small class settings are more amenable to group discussions, where it’s easier to get to know students and the instructor(s) on a personal level. In lecture settings, I’ve usually tried to sit somewhere regularly and speak to the people around me, or get to know people with unique insight who can also Let the Professor Teach – rare birds indeed. Group projects are good for forced interaction, but can be a pain. As the meme goes: “When I die, I want to be buried by my group project partners so I can be let down one more time.”

Actively Listen to Your Instructors

Actively listening to professors is a great way to learn about career opportunities and subjects relevant to your field that aren’t 100 percent related to the course. It’s not going to happen with each and every class, but there will be professors or instructors who will be formative to your career and life. I’ve found some amazing writers, artists and filmmakers, and their work, as a result of my instructors’ recommendations.

Socialize Outside the Classroom

Finally, going to campus events is a great way to learn about outside events. Musicians that you hear in the cafe in the Smith Union, for example, might be playing a venue near your home later in the week, or an artist you see on campus might be showing in a professional gallery or even the Portland Art Museum.

Make friends, or don’t. I went back to school thinking I didn’t need to make friends. But networking is where much of your college education gets its value. You have a limited time to interact with 20,000+ people. Make the most of it.

(photo: Andrew D. Jankowski)

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It’s Not All About Getting A Job

 

Version 2 By: Anna Sobczyk

I had a lot of illusions about starting college. Having grown up in a small town, I figured my move to Portland would initiate everything “falling into place.” To me, living in a big city meant an endless supply of opportunities and experiences. Six weeks after moving to Portland, nothing had fallen into place for me. I’d had no life-changing revelations, and I really started to question why I was here.

Then, of all things, a Business 101 lecture led me out of my rut. We watched a TedTalk of Simon Sinek, who developed the “Golden Circle” concept. It’s used to explain how companies communicate to consumers through three layers: what, how, and why. Most companies communicate from the outside in, starting with what and ending with why. Exceptional companies, however, will communicate the exact opposite way. Sinek demonstrates the difference this can make with Apple Inc, who begins its marketing message with answering why ”With everything we do, we aim to challenge the status quo. We aim to think differently. Our products are user friendly, beautifully designed, and easy to use. We just happen to make great computers. Want to buy one?” The way Apple communicates with the consumer market has separated it from its competitors. People are inexplicably drawn to Apple, simply because by starting their message with why, Apple is appealing to the emotional impulse. They recognize that profit is not a reason why to do something, but a result of a deeper reason.

Afterwards, I began to draw parallels between the lecture and myself in college. I figured the reason I came to college was to earn a degree strictly so I could get a good paying job. However, getting a job after college wasn’t the reason why I was attending, it was merely the result I expected. Even though this a result I still want, my perception of attaining it has changed. For me, college isn’t just a pathway towards a career, but also a way to cultivate and explore my interests. Until that lecture, I hadn’t realized how overwhelmed I’d become from trying to force that result. Now, I’ve stopped trying to connect my major to job titles with fat salaries in favor of choosing classes that pique my curiosity.

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Hats off to pampering

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By: Sara Kirkpatrick 

As students, we tend to wear an assortment of hats, each representing the variety of responsibilities we shoulder daily.  This includes student, leader, networker, teammate, organizer, employee, freelancer, etc.  Our list of responsibilities is ever increasing, as employer demands are constantly changing and the need for additional skills outside of traditional coursework is highly desired. In the midst of this evolving set of commitments, we often forget to take time out of our busy lives to care of ourselves.

If you’re like me, it’s hard to even imagine prioritizing something as simple as taking a bubblebath when there are so many other demands in life. Despite my busy lifestyle, I am slowly attempting to rearrange my priorities to incorporate self-care (pampering) activities, since it is an important aspect of stress management, which in turn is essential for academic success.

It is amazing how beneficial a massage, soak in the tub, and other forms of pampering can be to revitalize us inside and out. Here are some pampering suggestions:

  • Take a scented bubble bath
  • Schedule a manicure and pedicure
  • Cleanse facial pores with a clay mask
  • Get a massage

Wearing lots of hats is definitely a balancing act, which is why prioritizing and scheduling at least some pampering activities is crucial. Self-care allows us the time we need to de-stress and revitalize so we can feel our best, physically, mentally, and emotionally.

Alternatively, students are encouraged to visit PSU’s Mind Spa , a space on campus for students to relax and rejuvenate, and where some of these services are available for free.

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ORGANIZE! And I’m not talking about clutter.

img_4878 By Emma Eberhart

In the wake of last week’s presidential election, now is the time to organize for social justice. Organize, in this context, means coordinating with others to take action or plan events for a better and more just America.

Below are links to some local Portland groups that have been around awhile, or are just starting up, and anyone can join. Click on their name and it will take you to their Facebook page!

  1. Portland Rising Tide
  2. Rose City Antifa
  3. Marilyn Buck Abolitionist Collective
  4. Portland Tenants United
  5. Socialist Alternative Portland
  6. Portland State International Socialist Organization
  7. Don’t Shoot Portland
  8. Anyone’s Resistance

A united front is the only way that we will successfully stand against Trump and stand for an inclusive America – one that does not allow for racism, misogyny, and homophobia to exist without resistance.

Check out these local groups and how they are taking steps to combat bigotry here in Portland.

*Featured Image is from Anyone’s Resistance Facebook*

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Quenching the Thirst for Leadership

img_4875 By: Beth Manney

In fall term I had the pleasure of being part of Emerging Leaders PSU. Our group met almost every Friday in October-November and was focused on delivering lessons on leadership skills to a talented group of students. I admit the program was not what I expected. I did a lot of leadership activities in high school: running a club centered on coping with stress and mental illness; managing/coaching our school’s Mock Trial team; leading a rebellion against the blatant disgustingness of the cafeteria food. Well, not so much that last one. Where were you, Michelle Obama?! I’d been thirsting for more leadership opportunities like a hound, so I’d thought the program would be about flexing those already-existing skills and getting funneled into a position at PSU.

Not quite. We participated in presentations and demonstrations that taught us about conflict and time management and how to improve your work environment. Honestly I had learned most of the material on my own already in a more learn-it-the-hard-way fashion. However, I did indeed learn skills that I now apply to my current workplaces, such as different ways to understand others’ strategies of communicating and performing.

There are two more levels, at least, of the Emerging Leaders program at PSU. Each level must be completed to proceed to the next. I’m sure PSU offers more opportunities for leadership-seekers to quench their thirst. If you’re interested in learning more about how to be a great leader, definitely sign up. The mentors in the program are seriously amazing, and some of them are students, too. I do believe that Emerging Leaders will help me succeed. I never cease to be awed at the fabulous programs PSU offers. Check out what’s waiting for you. Try something you haven’t as of yet. Put those feelers out there like an overcaffeinated octopus.